first_imgSANTA FE SPRINGS — Incumbent Santa Fe Springs City Councilman Gus Velasco says he’s putting his support behind challenger Michael Madrigal over incumbent Betty Putnam in next month’s council elections, because he believes it is time to reverse decades-old inequalities on the council. “For 35 years or so, there’s been a majority Hispanic population in Santa Fe Springs, but we’ve always had minority representation on the council,’ said Velasco, one of four candidates vying for three seats in the Nov. 8 City Council elections. “We’ve had a 4-1 ratio in favor of Caucasians, usually.’ Putnam, however, said qualifications, not ethnicity, should be voters’ primary concern. Putnam said she is more interested in enhancing community services, after the council cut some senior and children’s services during recent budget reductions. “There really aren’t any huge issues,’ Putnam said. “Everyone seems to think policing is doing real well and safety is under control. We had to cut back on services a little bit in the last three years. Bringing them back up to par is the main issue.’ Velasco says the city needs to be better prepared for terrorism and large-scale emergencies. “We want to make sure the staff is working with our local, state and federal agencies to make sure we’re well-connected to Homeland Security,’ he said. Madrigal, too, wants to make the city safer. “We need more Police Services officers, and to reinstate our ambulance service,’ said Madrigal. “My super heavy concerns are maintenance of residential areas – potholes, drains and gutters.’ @tagline: Sandy Mazza may be reached by calling (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3026, or by e-mail at sandy.mazza@sgvn.com. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week “(Latinos) have a majority on the council now, but I don’t think ethnicity should be an issue,’ she said. “I think a person should be selected to serve the community because of qualifications.’ She does believe, however, that it is important to have a woman represented on the council. Putnam now is the only woman serving on the council. “There should be a woman on the council because women have a different viewpoint,’ she said. “A woman has a softer heart, and is more interested in social issues.’ In addition to helping one another with their campaigns, Gonzalez, Velasco and Madrigal have similar platforms. Safety is key for them, they said. “I’m concerned about safety issues in the city,’ Gonzalez said. “Because we now have a healthy budget, I’m looking at beefing up our police services.’ last_img read more


first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest For those in previous generations, getting a handle on understanding the purchasing behaviors of the Millennial Generation can be somewhat vexing. At no point in recent generations has there been a more stark generational difference. This is largely due to changes in technology, a tough job market when entering the workforce and an increasingly global culture of inclusion and acceptance.“Millennials believe in fairness, inclusivity, access, and discovery. I define ‘Millennial’ based on mindset. You can look at a millennial by birth based on birth year — born in the late 70s to the late 90s — or you can look at it based upon behavior,” said Jeff Fromm, president of Future Cast and co-author of multiple books about marketing to Millennials. “You can find Millennials in their 50s who share those values, use mobile technology and are consumers of content. They are just as likely to pay for that coffee at Starbucks with their mobile phone as a Millennial-aged consumer is today.”While these generational differences may be of little consequence to some in the big scheme of things, people trying to directly market products are finding out how important these differences can be. The purchasing power of the Millennial Generation has quickly become noteworthy to savvy marketers. This has significant agricultural implications.“Millennials have a big interest in food, food culture and where their food comes from. They want access to information and that creates a lot of opportunities for smaller brands that are a lot of times more agile and nimble to create innovative products, provide more access to the sourcing of their products and get a small premium for those unique products,” Fromm said. “It’s a new day where small brands can compete more effectively than the big brands. Brands that get it right create huge sales volume potential around appealing to what Millennials value.”This trend can have tremendous implications for agriculture, particularly for small direct marketers who can sell products that provide the stories, information and experience millennial shoppers are seeking.”While these factors matter more to Millennials than previous generations, price is still important.“Price is hugely important, but Millennials are the ultimate day traders. They will pay a small premium for brands they love and then they will trade down to private label when they don’t see the value. Brands that do it right are able to get that small premium for their products,” he said. “Price is important, but there are ways to compete for Millennial affinity and earn it by using content, technology and other factors that would cause them to love your brand.”One way to appeal to Millennials is to provide an experience that they value.“Experience can mean access to being able to visit my favorite farm where I get my favorite products or it can mean inspired content from small brands that understand the best way to use their products,” Fromm said. “Experience is a way to create affinity and it is certainly important for the Millennial culture that has a desire to discover and learn and is collecting experiential currency along the way.”To find more from Fromm, visit Millenialmarketing.com.last_img read more


first_imgWorking with a new director or DP can be a tricky process that takes some time to develop. Here are some filmmaking tips to help streamline that process, and to make sure your production is getting the most out of that relationship.Top image: Quentin Tarantino and Robert Richardson on the set of Kill Bill via The Red ListWith advancements in technology and professional production equipment constantly becoming more affordable, it seems that timelines (and usually budgets) for projects become smaller and smaller every year. This means that you have to work more efficiently — and as a solid team — to finish with a project that everyone can be proud of.One of the best ways to do this is to make sure that the director and the director of photography have a clear and singular vision for the execution of the project. Here are some suggestions for ways to make sure the two are in sync.Start With a LookbookAn example of a strong look – Blade Runner via Warner Bros.An image can be a hard thing to explain with words. One easy way to make sure that the visual style of a project is decided on and agreed upon is to begin the process with a lookbook. A lookbook is a collection of images that define the look and tone of the image that you’re going for.It can be any number of things… paintings, photographs, stills from another film, anything that is a representation of what you want to do visually. It helps to take notes on each image, so that you can reference what it is about that image specifically that will support your story/look.I prefer to use a cloud-based file storage service for creating lookbooks (Dropbox, Google Drive, etc). This way, while on set or scouting a location, you can always pull up the lookbook and effectively communicate a visual idea on the spot. Evan E. Richards runs a blog with a comprehensive selection of screengrabs of various films that’s a great resource for building a lookbook.Learn Their Process Early OnChristopher Nolan via Warner Bros.Everyone does things differently. Some directors will want to have a lot of involvement in how the image is created, down to the placement of the camera and focal length of the lens. Other directors aren’t interested in those details, and will fully look to the DP to deliver the look that they’re going for, with little to no direction otherwise.This needs to be discussed ahead of time. That bit of information will completely define the nature of the DP’s job on that project, and it can be different every time. It’s important for everyone to know their role on set, and for all expectations to be made perfectly clear before the production begins. Some of these topics are touched on in this Hollywood Reporter roundtable of Oscar-nominated directors discussing their craft. Get Everyone InvolvedRobert Elswit location scouting for Nightcrawler via ScreenDailyIt’s not acceptable to bring the DP in right before the shoot. The DP should be able to walk the locations well ahead of time, taking photos, looking for power (if needed), and getting an overall game plan on load-in and the plan of attack. This will make it easier for them to create lighting diagrams for each of the setups as well, which is a huge timesaver (and will also allow them to put together the gear list for the shoot). A great app for creating lighting diagrams is Shot Designer.It’s important to work together in creation of a shot list (check out the awesome Shot Lister app) and game plan for each shoot day based on the location scout. This should be done before anyone starts to put together a schedule, and (in most cases) before booking the talent.It is the director of photography’s job to know what time will work best for each location (sun through windows, sun positions for best backlight, etc). If they never get to see the locations, there’s no way that they can do their job. This is one of the most overlooked issues in low-budget productions.Keep an Open Line of CommunicationJeff Cronenweth discusses a Gone Girl scene with director David Fincher via 20th Century FoxThere’s always time to talk. No matter how short on time you are, it will almost always save you time if you stop to pull your DP or director aside and have a quick chat about what’s going on and (hopefully) figure out what isn’t working. Sometimes you just have to get away from the rest of the crew and actors to really get some real thinking done.When things are moving and decisions are constantly being made, it’s really easy to get in the swing of things and lose track of what’s actually going on. Always be asking yourself: Are we executing the plan? Am I supporting my colleagues process? Are we achieving the look that we laid out in the lookbook? And most importantly: Are we making something we’re all going to be proud of?If there is ever any doubt, pull your director or DP aside and figure out how you can fix it — and do it sooner than later.Know Your Role in the RelationshipDenis Villeneuve and Roger Deakins working together via Warner Bros.In the end a film can look lousy but work because of a great performance but not the other way round. That’s something always worth remembering. – Roger DeakinsOne thing a DP should always remember is the pecking order on set. The director is always in control. While filmmaking is a very collaborative process, it’s important that the DP keep the ultimate vision of the director and execution of the project at the front of their mind at all times. If you don’t watch out for it, ego can set in and arguments can begin because the DP wants or takes too much control.However, that works both ways. If the director isn’t assuming the lead role in the execution of the project in a way that cannot be questioned, someone else is going to have to step up to make sure the project is completed. There is an art to doing this in a way that gets the best work out of people, while also getting the best out of the project.When working quickly, and under stressful guidelines, these things can be a weak point in the hyper-sensitive ecosystem that film sets usually become. It’s important to be aware of everything, and everyone’s feelings, especially when it comes to the way that the director and the DP work together.Have any filmmaking tips for the community? Share them in the comments below!last_img read more


first_imgOne of the key ingredients of a good video is great sound. Here’s how you can get pristine audio on a variety of budgets.Cover image via guruXOX.There’s an old adage in the film industry that goes like this: Great sound quality can save bad footage, but great footage will never save bad sound. There’s just something that ruins your immersion when you notice terrible audio. Take The Blair Witch Project for example (the original, of course). The filmmakers used a cheap handheld camera, but you still became immersed into the film because of quality sound. I’ve seen countless films that were cinematically excellent, but bad sound completely kicked me out.You may think that you don’t have enough money in your budget for quality sound-recording devices, but I promise you, you do. A good audio kit includes a shotgun mic, a lavalier mic, and a portable audio recorder. In this article, we’ll explore three options for three different budgets.The Beginner Budget: Under $100If you are just starting out in the film and video world, and you want to make a short film, or you just plain don’t have the money (it’s okay, we’re called starving artists for a reason), then this is the option for you.Audio-Technica ATR-6550 Condenser Shotgun Microphone — $60 Image via Audio-Technica.This shotgun mic is the cheapest you can get, but you will still get consistent quality out of it, compared to in-camera audio. (Pro-tip: if you don’t have a boom attachment, you can attach the mic to a painter’s pole that you can buy for less than $20.)Audio-Technica ATR3350iS Omnidirectional Condenser Lavalier Microphone — $30If you’re doing interview-style work, it’s important to have a lavalier mic to get consistent audio of your subject. This lav is wired, and it can connect directly to a smart phone for recording.Yes, a smart phone. You can use your own as a personal audio recorder. This lav can plug directly into the phone, and you can use your phone’s native sound-recording program. If you don’t have a native recording app, try using Audio Recorder from the Play Store. (Note that you most likely won’t be able to monitor audio while recording.)You can connect either of these to the camera as well, so you can record audio using these external devices instead of your camera’s sub-par onboard mic.The Intermediate Budget: $350For those getting a little more serious about their filmmaking careers, take a look at these options.Zoom H4nSP 4-Channel Handy Recorder — $159Having this “Handy” recorder is, in fact, pretty handy. You can hook up both conventional audio jacks and XLRs. Recording on a personal audio recorder is essential when running audio, since it has dials you can use to adjust levels on the fly — along with a headphone jack so you can listen to your audio in real time.Rode VideoMic Shotgun Condenser Microphone w/ Boom Pole, 10′ Extension Cable, and Adaptor — $159Image via RØDE.RØDE is a pretty big player in the industry, and every filmmaker usually gets one as their first pro mic. You can find sets online that include the microphone, boom, cable, and adapter set for around $150USD.Fifine 20-Channel UHF Wireless Lavalier Lapel Microphone — $35Image via Fifine.This wireless lav kit will complement your audio recorder well, and it will also give your subject the freedom to walk around.The Professional Build — $1,000When you want to get serious about contracting your services as an audio recorder, you’ll need the equipment to do the job.Zoom H6 Handy Recorder — $400 Image via Zoom.This has been my go-to recorder for a while. It has a very simple user interface, four channels, and an easy layout. Simply press the channel button to record on each one. I usually attach it to my belt so I can monitor audio while running boom at the same time.Sennheiser MKE-600 Shotgun Mic — $670center_img Image via Sennheiser.Sennheiser is probably the best you’re going to get with audio devices, and their reputation definitely precedes them. This shotgun mic will last you ages — and deliver consistent, quality sound.Sennheiser ew 112-p G3 Camera-Mount Wireless Microphone System — $629Sennheiser also makes some of the best lav mics in the business. These guys have great transmitters that will capture true sound on any set. They come with a hefty price tag, but that’s what you pay for perfection.Looking for some more gear recommendations? Check out these write-ups.The Comprehensive Guide To Building Your Own Video Editing PCHands-On Review: The Hasselblad X1D Digital Medium FormatVideo Gear: Quick and Easy 3-Point Lighting BundlesDIY Filmmaking: How to Build Your Own Dolly for $50Sony Announces the a7 III 4K Camera for Under $2000last_img read more