first_imgJamaica’s top-ranked squash players, Chris Binnie and Lewis Walters, will take on rivals from the United States in the KPMG International Squash Series, which is scheduled for December 8-9 at the Liguanea Club in New Kingston.Dubbed ‘Yankees vs Yardies’, the two-day extravaganza will see local stars Binnie and Walters facing their stiffest competition to date on local soil. The US contingent is comprised of Chris Gordon, currently ranked number 56 by the Professional Squash Association (PSA), and Chris Hanson, who is number 83 in the world.Binnie, who has dominated the game in Jamaica and the Caribbean for the last eight years, is currently at 76, while Walters is ranked at 110.Binnie will face off with Hanson on the first day of play, while Walters will be up against Gordon. The players will then trade opponents for another round of matches on day two.Strong undercardThe event will also feature a strong undercard, which will see Jamaica’s number three player, all-rounder Bruce Burrowes, going head-to-head with rising star Julian Morrison.Burrowes and Morrison will be back in action again in mixed doubles on day two, when they will be paired with 12-time All-Jamaica Ladies Champion Karen Anderson and five-time Caribbean Ladies Champion Marlene West, respectively.The KPMG series is being staged as a major fundraiser for the Jamaica Squash Association (JSA) as part of an effort to increase financing for its Junior Outreach Programme and also to provide support for Jamaica’s professional squash players. Binnie, Walters and Morrison currently compete on the PSA circuit, which involves travel, accommodation, medical and coaching expenses.”We are very excited about our professional squash series because it will expose local fans and newcomers to the game to an extraordinarily high standard of squash,” said president of the JSA, Chris Hind.”Chris and Lewis are the top two players in the Caribbean, but, in general, they don’t get a lot of strong competition on local soil; so we look forward to seeing them do battle with other world-ranked professional players, who will definitely test their skills.”The KPMG International Squash Series is also sponsored by Supreme Ventures, BCIC and the Liguanea Club.Tickets are on sale at the Liguanea Club at a cost of $1,500 for children, $3,000 for adults and $5,000 for VIP packages, which include food and beverages. Persons purchasing tickets for both nights can get two children’s tickets for $2,500, two adult tickets for $5,000 and two VIP passes for $8,000. Interested persons can call 371-0476.last_img read more


first_imgBob Daemmrich for The Texas TribuneOn the last day of the 85th Legislative session, protesters opposed to Senate Bill 4 — the “sanctuary cities” bill fill up the rotunda of the state Capitol in Austin on May 29, 2017.Opponents of the state’s immigration enforcement legislation have asked a federal appeals court to reconsider a decision that allowed most of the controversial measure to go into effect.Attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union, Travis County and the city of Austin on Tuesday asked the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals to rehear the case en banc, which means the entire court would consider the lawsuit. The move comes two weeks after a three-judge panel of the same court allowed most of the law, Senate Bill 4, to go into effect after major portions were initially blocked by a federal district judge in August. The ACLU represents the small border city of El Cenizo, which was the first to file suit last year to stop SB 4’s implementation days after Gov. Greg Abbottsigned it into law.SB 4 allows local law enforcement officers to question the immigration status of people they detain or arrest and punishes local government department heads and elected officials who don’t cooperate with federal immigration “detainers” — requests by agents to turn over immigrants subject to possible deportation — in the form of jail time and penalties that exceed $25,000. The legislation also applies to public universities and colleges.In August, U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia temporarily halted several parts of the bill, including a section that requires jail officials to honor the detainers. He also blocked sections that prohibit local entities from pursuing “a pattern or practice that ‘materially limits’ the enforcement of immigration laws” and another that prohibits “assisting or cooperating” with federal immigration officers as reasonable or necessary.But the appellate court panel’s ruling two weeks ago effectively unshackled the legislation, allowing most of it to be implemented while the original case goes back to Garcia’s courtroom. The only provision that is still blocked is one that punishes local officials for “adopting, enforcing or endorsing” policies that prohibit or limit enforcement of immigration laws. The judges kept that injunction in place but said it only applies to the word “endorse.”The list of local entities that have previously filed suit against SB 4 also includes El Paso, Maverick and Bexar counties, the cities of El Paso, San Antonio and Houston, among others. Nina Perales, the vice president of litigation for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, or MALDEF, said if the 5th Circuit agrees to hear the case, all parties to the suit will become involved. MALDEF represents the cities of San Antonio and El Paso, as well as Bexar County, in the litigation.“We are all supporting each other’s efforts and working together in close collaboration and putting our resources in a two-pronged strategy,” she said.The other angle is preparing for the trial at the district level, where Garcia will hear arguments over the bill’s constitutionality. Perales said it’s unclear when — or if — the 5th Circuit will come down with a decision on Tuesday’s petition. Another option is to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to consider the injunction, but Perales said plaintiffs have to wait on the appellate court to act before considering that move.“It’s like a decision tree, and we won’t know what options are available to us until the 5th Circuit responds,” she said.After the court’s decision earlier this month that allowed most of the bill to stand, several opponents of the measure said they weren’t surprised because the 5th Circuit is considered a conservative body. But Perales warned against painting any group of judges with “too broad a brush.”She pointed to a 2013 decision by the same court in favor of MALDEF during its case against the Texas city of Farmers Branch, which passed an ordinance that would have punished landlords from renting to people based on their immigration status. “These are the life lessons that teach you not to predict what the 5th Circuit might do or how they might decide a case,” she said. Sharelast_img read more


first_imgA space elevator would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, and then another 40,000 miles to a weighted structure for stability. And a space elevator – if it ever becomes reality – will be quite long. NASA needs about 144,000 miles of nanotube to build one. In theory, a cable would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, which is the distance at which satellites remain in geostationary orbit. Due to the competing forces of the Earth’s gravity and outward centrifugal pull, the elevator station would remain at that distance like a satellite. Then the cable would extend another 40,000 miles into space to a weighted structure for stability. An elevator car would be attached to the nanotube cable and powered into space along the track.NASA and its partner, the Spaceward Foundation, hope that a space elevator could serve as a cost-effective and relatively clean mode of space transportation. NASA’s current shuttle fleet is set to retire in 2010, and the organization doesn’t have enough funds to replace it until 2014 at the earliest. To fill the gap, NASA is hiring out shuttles to provide transportation to the International Space Station from private companies. So NASA could use a space elevator, the sooner the better. Space elevators could lift material at just one-fifth the cost of a rocket, since most of a rocket’s energy is used simply to escape Earth’s gravity. Not only could a space elevator offer research expeditions for astronauts, the technology could also expand the possibilities for space tourism and even space colonization.Currently, the Cambridge team can make about 1 gram of the new carbon material per day, which can stretch to 18 miles in length. Alan Windle, professor of materials science at Cambridge, says that industrial-level production would be required to manufacture NASA’s request for 144,000 miles of nanotube. Nevertheless, the web-like nanotube material is promising.”The key thing is that the process essentially makes carbon into smoke, but because the smoke particles are long thin nanotubes, they entangle and hold hands,” Windle said. “We are actually making elastic smoke, which we can then wind up into a fiber.”Windle and his colleagues presented their results last month at a conference in Luxembourg, which attracted hundreds of attendees from groups such as NASA and the European Space Agency. John Winter of EuroSpaceward, which organized the conference, thought the new material was a significant step.”The biggest problem has always been finding a material that is strong enough and lightweight enough to stretch tens of thousands of miles into space,” said Winter. “This isn’t going to happen probably for the next decade at least, but in theory this is now possible. The advances in materials for the tether are very exciting.”via: Times Online and Gizmodo© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth Citation: Long, Stretchy Carbon Nanotubes Could Make Space Elevators Possible (2009, January 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-stretchy-carbon-nanotubes-space-elevators.html (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists from Cambridge University have developed a light, flexible, and strong type of carbon nanotube material that may bring space elevators closer to reality. Motivated by a $4 million prize from NASA, the scientists found a way to combine multiple separate nanotubes together to form long strands. Until now, carbon nanotubes have been too brittle to be formed into such long pieces.last_img read more