first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 15, 2010 at 12:00 pm Just outside the Syracuse locker room last Saturday against Washington, minutes after a disappointing loss, Delone Carter tried to put the outcome into perspective. Missed opportunities had deflated the optimism that accompanied SU to Seattle. Frustration began to set in. But despite the loss, and the pain that followed, the senior running back wasn’t seeing the setback as a repeat of years past. Not even close. ‘I feel no team is the same. I feel like we define ourselves,’ Carter said. ‘We’re going to continue to define ourselves. … Positively.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Days have passed, but the feelings remain. And now, Carter and his teammates enter this weekend looking to eliminate the feelings following that disappointing loss in Seattle. And with emotion from last Saturday’s drubbing still lingering, Syracuse (1-1) will attempt to restore its pride in its home opener against Maine (1-1) at 7:15 p.m. Saturday inside the Carrier Dome. ‘We just want to get back into this week and improve and take another step forward and get another win,’ Carter said Wednesday. ‘Just the next opponent, that’s all it is.’ Getting the bad taste out of its mouth is just one of the goals for the Orange heading into Saturday’s contest. SU hasn’t won a home opener since 2004 — the last time it made an appearance in a bowl game. Taking care of business this weekend would certainly be a big step toward that postseason berth head coach Doug Marrone and his players have been vocal about since preseason camp. Before last weekend, Syracuse looked like it might be a bowl-caliber team this season. The Orange dismantled Akron on the road, 29-3, and the defense looked as good as it has in years. But against Washington, SU struggled for the final three quarters. The defense allowed five touchdowns against the Huskies after allowing zero against Akron. The Orange went from having a 10-point lead to losing by three touchdowns. Erasing the pain from last week’s poor performance will be on the minds of the coaches and players. ‘It hurt,’ Marrone said at his weekly press conference Monday. ‘Any time you lose a game, it hurts. If it doesn’t hurt, then you don’t have the right culture. … It is like anything else in life, how you deal with adversity, how you deal with failure and how you come back from that.’ Syracuse and Maine faced each other for the first time in 2009, with SU winning decisively, 41-24, at the Dome. Carter led the Orange offense with 72 yards and three touchdowns on 19 carries, while Derrell Smith led the defense with 11 tackles. Against the Black Bears Saturday, both should play a pivotal role. In spite of two rather unimpressive performances to start the season, the Maine defense is only allowing 3.1 yards per carry against the run. Carter and backfield mate Antwon Bailey will have to increase their production for the Orange to win that battle. Offensively, Maine averaged 186.5 yards rushing in those first two games behind the running of Jared Turcotte and Pushaun Brown. Smith and the Syracuse defense — which has allowed 157 yards per game against the run — will have their work cut out for them. ‘We know we’ll get their best when they come in here,’ Marrone said. ‘I have a lot of respect for (Maine head coach Jack) Cosgrove and that football team. … They’re always big, they’re always tough, they’re always physical and then, after last year, we have to expect the unexpected anywhere on the field.’ Despite Maine’s strong points, the Black Bears are still an FCS school. The Syracuse players are well aware of that fact. Yet after a painful loss at Washington, SU is heading into this weekend not taking anybody lightly. And while the players insist Maine is ‘just the next opponent,’ it’s quite possible SU is planning to take out its frustration on what it knows is an inferior opponent. That will be a key factor Saturday. ‘We’re trying to change history and change the culture here,’ SU receiver Van Chew said. ‘So getting a big win will be good.’ All week long, players and coaches were chomping at the bit to get back on the field. To prove last week’s loss was a fluke. To quickly regain that optimistic feeling that had suddenly evaporated. Maine was shut out, 3-0, by Albany to start this season. Not exactly the evidence to suggest it should pose a threat to a Syracuse squad salivating at a chance for redemption. And after starting the season with two games on the road, SU returns home against the same Maine team it throttled in the second half a year ago. Perhaps it’s the perfect situation to begin erasing any doubts about its bowl legitimacy this season. Said Marrone: ‘We expect them to come back, give us their best effort, and get ready to win a game and go above .500.’ aljohn@syr.educenter_img Commentslast_img read more


first_imgIn July, Fergie released the music video to her new track, titled “M.I.L.F.$.” Now, this isn’t the American Pie acronym as we know it — Fergie has redefined M.I.L.F. as “Moms I’d Like To Follow.” Though Fergie claims the message of her song is about “empowering women who do it all,” the music video ironically hypersexualizes women and their consumption of milk. Similar to Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda,” the Fergie video features a concupiscent “Milfman,” who lusts after dancing celebrity moms. However, the message of female empowerment gets lost in the overwhelming parts of the video that, absent of sound, can be mistaken for high-class porn. What really caught me off guard was the allusion to “Got Milk,” the American advertising campaign that vigorously promoted the consumption of cow’s milk through celebrity ads from 1993 to 2014. After an abrupt ending, the song resumed for its last hurrah, as a TV appeared with a twist on the iconic “Got Milk” campaign reading “got milf?” Following this message was what seemed to be a revival of the “Got Milk” campaigns — Fergie seductively poured milk all over her body while the other mothers drank milk and sported the infamous milk mustaches, perpetuating the myth that cow’s milk is a vital source of calcium and protein for bone and muscle growth. In contrast to the school curriculums that necessitate dairy as part of the food pyramid, Fergie taught her students about alternative milk substitutes as she played the role of a (sexy schoolgirl) teacher for a nutrition class. The list on the board included the terms almond, coconut, rice, hemp, soy, dairy, protein, calcium and calories.Though it’s unclear whether Fergie intended to endorse dairy — they could have been consuming almond milk — the lascivious use of the milk alluded “Got Milk” and the support of money-hungry dairy companies.The dairy industry is horrific. Since female cows only lactate when they’re pregnant or have a newborn to feed, dairy workers repeatedly artificially inseminate them starting at the age of 12 months to continually keep them pregnant. Confined to what the industry calls “rape racks,” the workers send tubes with bull semen up the female cow’s vaginas. Sometimes the workers even stick their fists inside the cows to loosen the area.When a female cow gives birth, the vicious cycle repeats itself. Female cows are taken from their mothers and raised to be milk machines, and male cows are slain before being sold as veal. The anguish the mother cow faces after having her babies torn from her sometimes results in days of continuous moans as she searches for her newborns.The habitual insemination of female cows results in premature aging, exhaustion and mastitis — inflammation and sometimes infection of the udder. Pus and blood is commonly found in cow’s milk and is filtered, but not always completely. In the U.S., 750,000 somatic cells are allowed per milliliter. Somatic cells, which in this case are mostly white blood cells, are the same as the pus that erupts from a giant zit.After usually four to five years of incessant exploitation, the female cow collapses, and is then taken to the meat industries to be slaughtered and sold as meat. Aside from the explicit abuse, dairy has time again proved to be detrimental to our health. In fact, the USDA, responsible for creating the food pyramid guidelines, had a team of their scientists look into the scientific basis of the claims made in the “milk mustache” ads. The department revealed that milk doesn’t actually benefit sports performance. It also stated that dairy is linked to prostate cancer and heart diseases and causes digestive problems for 75 percent of people with lactose intolerance (maybe because humans aren’t meant to consume cow’s milk!). Finally, a more well-known fact is that countries with the lowest rates of dairy and calcium consumption — Africa and Asia, for instance — have the lowest rates of osteoporosis.Needless to say, you can get all of the calcium and protein you need from plant-based sources, such as kale, spinach, almonds,tofu, tempeh, tahini, beans, bread and broccoli.While Got Milk’s campaign should have been called Got Beastiality or Got Pus, Fergie was spot on with “Got Milf,” as she’s proved with her 112 million Youtube views that sex sells.However, had Fergie continued to extend upon the message of female empowerment, she could have sparked social change for females — both women, by delving into the celebrities’ success as leading figures — and cows, by advocating for plant-based milks.Tessa Nesis is a sophomore majoring in NGOs and social change.  Her column, “The Sentient Bean,” runs on Thursdays.last_img read more


first_imgAs his parents described how “emotional” it was to see their son make his MLB debut, Diaz drove a 97 mph fastball from deGrom over the right-field wall. At the crack of the bat, Díaz’s father began shouting “Oh! Oh! Oh! Oh!” and continued the chant as his son rounded the bases.Then he began shouting “Isan! Isan! Isan!”Marlins rookie Isan Diaz homered off Cy Young winner Jacob deGrom for his first MLB hit while his dad was being interviewed.His reaction was incredible 😄 pic.twitter.com/Wdd7wL2m4m— ESPN (@espn) August 5, 2019″Sorry,” Díaz’s father needlessly apologized before continuing the interview. “We just homered off deGrom. He’s a Cy Young winner!”Díaz, 23, came over to the Marlins in the deal that sent Christian Yelich to Milwaukee. The second baseman is considered the No. 86 prospect in baseball, according to MLB Pipeline.The scouting report touts Díaz’s power potential. It definitely showed up in his MLB debut, in a moment he — and his parents — will never forget. Marlins prospect Isan Díaz hit his first MLB home run Monday, resulting in a must-see video clip.As Díaz faced reigning National League Cy Young winner Jacob deGrom of the Mets in the sixth inning, Fox Sports happened to be interviewing his mother and father in the grandstands.last_img read more