first_imgOur Sports ReporterGUWAHATI: Prag News and Pratidin Group registered big win in the TG Barua Inter Media Cricket championship held at the Judges ground here today. Pratidin Group in the first match of the day defeated GL Publications by 8 wickets. Abhinash Thakuria (3-11), Tonmoy Dey (3-12) and Jagjit Singh (38no), all from the winning side, came out with good performance in the match. Meanwhile in the second game Prag News thrashed NE News by 173 runs. Mriganka Sarma (105 no) and Nikhil Basfore (77), Bonojit Kalita (3-2) from Prag News made brilliant performance in the match.Also Read: Assam take 2nd innings lead in Cricket tournament against Tamil Nadu Also Watch: Minister Pijush Hazarika rebuts claims of paid crowd at BJP peace rally in Jagi Roadlast_img read more


first_img1 Real Madrid star Alvaro Morata has quit his Ibiza honeymoon to push through his £70million move to Manchester United, which could be completed in the next 48 hours.Morata married Alice Campello in Venice last week and then headed to the Balearic Island to celebrate his nuptials.But with the deal coming to a crucial phase, Morata has decided to head back to Madrid to help complete his switch to Old Trafford, according to Spanish newspaper AS.The report says Morata has spoken with United boss Jose Mourinho on the phone on several occasions and in keen on a move to Manchester.And reports in Dario Gol say the move could be completed in the next two days.Morata scored 15 goals in just 14 La Liga starts last term, but failed to secure a regular place in Zinedine Zindane’s side that completed a domestic and European Double. Antoine Griezmann had been Mourinho’s No 1 target, but that move now looks off the table and Zlatan Ibrahimovic was placed on the released earlier this month. Morata could become a Manchester United player in the next 48 hours last_img read more


first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Growing up on the North side of Milwaukee, Jordan Poole was always one of the youngest, smallest kids on the pick up court. Charges to the basket were met by stronger bodies, and so he had to find other means to score.“I was accustomed to finding a way to create my own shot because, when I was younger playing against older kids, you would go to the basket and it really wasn’t doing too much. They were just physically stronger,” Poole said. “I think that’s something I’ve never …last_img read more


first_img(Visited 273 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Lee Berger’s remarkable cache of hominid bones found deep in a South African cave is generating a lot of news, but major questions remain.At one level, it’s a great adventure story: squeezing through narrow cave passages and finding bones all over the floor, so hard to reach that a team of skinny female investigators had to be recruited to map and retrieve them. But at a scientific level, what these bones mean is not clear. Lee Berger (champion of Australopithecus sediba, 12/08/11) has given the bones a new species name within our genus: Homo naledi. He is almost as controversial, however, as the fossils themselves.The bones appear to be from about 15 individuals. No other mammal bones were found there, leading to speculations it was an intentional burial site. The skeletons seem to be mosaics of human and australopith features; some think they fit within Homo erectus. But since no dates have been assigned to the fossils yet, even evolutionary paleoanthropologists are reluctant to draw conclusions.It’s premature, therefore, to evaluate this find. What we can do is draw attention to the variety of opinions in the press.Evolutionary OpinionsHomo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa (eLife). This is the lead paper by Berger et al. announcing the find.Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa (eLife). This companion paper describes the conditions in which the bones were found.Crowdsourcing digs up an early human species (Nature). This news article begins with a photo of Lee Berger smiling triumphantly outside Rising Star Cave where the bones were found. Ewen Callaway describes how Berger recruited cavers to excavate the room deep inside the cave, and gives some preliminary opinions of other paleoanthropologists.New human species discovered (Science Magazine). Veteran hominid news reporter Ann Gibbons describes the process of finding the fossils, giving Lee Berger a chance to assure readers that his expedition”isn’t a media stunt.”South Africa’s new human ancestor sparks racial row (PhysOrg). Some South Africans are taking offense at possible racial overtones to the evolutionary claims made about Homo naledi.From the archives: The scientist behind those controversial new hominin fossils (Science Magazine). Michael Balter asks “Why is this enthusiastic paleontologist so controversial?” and points to a 2011 feature story about Lee Berger.New Human Ancestor Elicits Awe—and Many Questions (National Geographic). Jamie Shreeve discusses frustration over not having dates for the bones, and perplexity of how they got there. The possibility of radiocarbon dating is discussed.Mystery Lingers Over Ritual Behavior of New Human Ancestor (National Geographic). This entry begins with artwork of creatures with human-like bodies but ape-like facial features carrying their dead into the cave for burial. Writer Nadia Drake discusses whether ritual behavior over death of kin is unique to humans.Human Evolution 101 (National Geographic). Nadia Drake takes advantage of the news about Homo naledi to ask leading questions like, “Why are scientists certain that human evolution happened?”12 Theories of How We Became Human, and Why They’re All Wrong (National Geographic). Balancing out Drake’s positivism, Mark Strauss recounts the many ideas about human evolution that have fallen by the wayside over the years. He doesn’t mention Homo naledi.Opinion: What about Homo naledi’s geologic age? (PhysOrg). Darren Curnoe laments over not having established a geological age for the fossils. “Its just the sort of thing that infuriates many scientists and detracts from an otherwise significant discovery; pity really.”New species of extinct human found in cave may rewrite history (New Scientist). Colin Barras includes photos of the fossils, artwork of the presumed facial features, and a map of the cave chamber where they were found. “ONE thousand four hundred bones, 140 teeth, belonging to at least 15 individual skeletons – and that’s just what was recovered in a single short field session,” he begins.Homo naledi: Unanswered questions about the newest human species (New Scientist). Rowan Hooper briefly discusses the main questions regarding the find. “We don’t even know how old H. naledi was. It could be millions of years old, making it one of the very earliest species of Homo, or only tens or hundreds of thousands of years old, making it a relict species of human that survived into modern times,” he says. “…The team say it may be possible to use isotope testing to age the remains, and that no attempt has yet been made to extract DNA.”Researcher argues that there’s more to the genus Homo than we may think (PhysOrg). This is not specifically about Homo naledi. Joe Miksch discusses the views of Jeffrey Schwarz, who complains, “If we want to be objective, we shall almost certainly have to scrap the iconic list of (genus and species) names in which hominid fossil specimens have historically been trapped and start from the beginning.”Non-Evolutionary OpinionsHomo naledi as Spin Detector (Evolution News & Views). Ann Gauger gives an intelligent-design perspective on the bones, taking issue with some of the initial interpretations, providing quotes that illustrate spin doctoring. Her earlier piece on ENV also concentrates on separating fact from interpretation. Gauger was co-author with Douglas Axe and Casey Luskin of the Discovery Institute book, Science and Human Origins.Scientists dispute ‘new’ species discovery (World Magazine). Casey Luskin gets a quote in Daniel James Devine’s article on Homo naledi, a fairly straightforward account of the find. Luskin comments, “Whenever you hear the word ‘mosaic’ in evolutionary lingo, what that means is this species does not fit very well into our preferred phylogenic scheme.” In World, an ID-friendly Christian news magazine, Devine says that Berger admits “the fossils might be only tens of thousands of years old.” He also points out that “some scientists dispute Berger’s contention that all 1,500 bones came from the same species.”What to make of Homo naledi? More pseudo-scientific claims of human ancestry (CMI). Marc Ambler discusses the flamboyant character of Lee Berger. He notes that all other fossils in the area had been australopiths. Central point is cautionary:One will have to wait and see whether the evolutionary scientific community come down on the side of the remains being Homo, or just Australopithecus. But why label the remains Homo naledi if there is so much indication that these may have been ordinary humans with some unique anatomical variations just as there are variations today between different people groups but all descended from the first two people created by God—Adam and Eve? University of California’s Tim White, who holds a different interpretation of human evolution, believes the remains belong to the species H. erectus, named in the 19th century. He is reported as saying that “New species should not be created willy-nilly. In order to claim a new species one has to demonstrate that it’s different from anything that’s ever been known.”Homo naledi, a New Human Ancestor? (ICR). Frank Sherwin gives his initial take on the fossils, ending with a suggestion that the individuals are more ape-like than human-like, pointing to doubts about the intentional burial interpretation. Incidentally, ICR is about to release its new 4-part DVD production on the human body, Made in His Image; click here for trailer and information.Other Human-Evolution NewsAlmost buried in the news about Homo naledi was another major announcement about Homo bones in a cave in Spain. In Science Magazine, Ann Gibbons writes about the new dates assigned to Denisovans, ranging from 50,000 to as much as 170,000 years ago. Gibbons thinks “they help solidify our murky view of Denisovans,” but can such a vast range of dates be plausible for individuals with many of the capabilities of Neanderthals and modern humans? And how much can be learned from a tiny fragment of a pinky fingerbone? “Denisovans occupied Denisova Cave repeatedly over more than 100,000 years,” she claims in a related Science Magazine article without winking a skeptical eye. “Neandertals slipped in as well, and modern humans were the last to live there.”Gibbons also claimed in a recent Science Magazine piece that Neanderthal DNA is shaking up the family tree. But that’s old news. She leaves science for the humanities in “Humanity’s Long, Lonely Road,” speculating this way and that about the relationships of Denisovans, Neanderthals and so-called modern humans (although the differences between all three are slight). Her speculations put modern humans on a long, lonely road as far back as 3/4 of a million years ago. “That would mean that the ancestors of humans were already wandering down a solitary path, apart from the other kinds of archaic humans on the planet, 100,000 to 400,000 years earlier than expected.” It sure took these lookalikes a long time to learn farming.Most curious in the early-man news is Michael Balter’s suggestion in Science Magazine that the “world’s oldest oatmeal” may have been discovered in an Italian cave. Estimated 32,000 years old, that would make it 25,000 years before the invention of farming. One would think they would tire of the same breakfast cereal after two weeks, let alone 25,000 years.New Scientist, meanwhile, drags in climate change to explain “key moments in human evolution.” Climate change becomes an all-purpose gimmick for explaining any evolutionary mystery, but it has a problem: why didn’t all the other species change accordingly? It explains opposite outcomes; therefore, it explains nothing.Eskimos are human, aren’t they? Sure they are. But changes to their stature—genetic mutations and all—occurred rapidly (geologically speaking) due to their high fat diet, Julie Hussin writes in The Conversation. She attributes this to natural selection, but hey: the Inuit can marry Europeans or Chinese and have happy kids.It’s an appropriate time to remember Ian Tattersal and Jeffrey Schwarz’s critical comments in Science Magazine about defining the genus Homo. These veteran paleoanthropologists think their colleagues have been going about it all wrong. There is no simple ancestor-descendent relationship to be found in human fossils. “If we want to be objective, we shall almost certainly have to scrap the iconic list of names in which hominin fossil specimens have historically been trapped, and start from the beginning by hypothesizing morphs, building testable theories of relatedness, and rethinking genera and species.” What does that imply for “Homo naledi“?In conclusion, we remind readers that “the myth of the missing link does science no favors,” as Sean Nee argues in The Conversation. Depending on the traits one focuses on, or one’s starting metanarrative, any story of relationships can be concocted; “we must choose our metaphors wisely, lest we be misled,” he says. “The Great Chain of Being, strung through evolutionary space by Blind Watchmakers, with missing links waiting to be discovered, isn’t going to help us understand infectious disease” or anything else that matters to us. Fossils like those announced by Lee Berger need to be interpreted on their own terms.Update 9/21/15: At Evolution News & Views, Casey Luskin provides a detailed look at four major controversies about these fossils, including their classification, whether they were buried or chase into the cave, whether they comprise multiple species, and more. He provides many quotes from the literature.We provide these links as preliminary coverage regarding so-called Homo naledi. Obviously many questions are floating around, and without dates, even the evolutionists don’t know what to think. If original unfossilized tissue or radiocarbon is found, the evolutionary story will be moot; evolutionists would have to claim, like with Homo floresiensis (the “hobbit”) that the creatures were relicts of earlier evolution, caught in some kind of refugium away from evolving modern humans. That would seem hard to maintain. Rather than rely on the opinions of experts, go to the original papers and read them critically, asking the kinds of questions evolutionists don’t think about.In a profound new peer-reviewed paper in Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, creation geneticist John Sanford and team have shown that human evolution is unworkable anyway. There is simply not enough time, using realistic models of fixation and population size, for the mutations needed to change an ape into a man to have occurred (this is similar to the argument against whale evolution in the new film Living Waters). And that’s only one of numerous falsifications of neo-Darwinism.With unguided mechanisms off the table, the only rational alternative for interpreting the bones from Rising Star Cave will be to start with intelligent design or Genesis 1.last_img read more


first_imgDidi Sydown in a dance scene from Johann Strauss’ opera Die Fledermaus. Gerald Samaai, principal tenor for the Eoan Group, during a rehearsal at the Cape Town City Hall. May Abrahamse singing the role of Rosalinde in Eoan’s 1962 production of Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus.(Images: Cloete Breytenbach)MEDIA CONTACTS• Dr Hilde RoosEoan book project co-ordinator+27 21 808 2597Wilma den HartighA new book has been published to celebrate the 80th birthday of the Eoan Group, South Africa’s first grassroots amateur opera, ballet and drama organisation.Eoan – Our Story is the first book to tell the story of the relatively unknown group, which was established in 1933 by British immigrant Helen Southern-Holt, as a cultural and charity organisation in the former inner-city suburb of District Six in Cape Town.The publication is a project of the Documentation Centre for Music (Domus) at Stellenbosch University (SU). It was compiled by the Eoan History Project, with Dr Hilde Roos and Wayne Muller as editors.The Eoan Group played an important role in promoting the performance of classical music in South Africa, developing artistic talent and preserving the vibrant cultural heritage of District Six.This historic area is known for the forced removal of about 60 000 of its residents during the 1970s by the apartheid regime.The name Eoan comes from the Greek word ‘Eos’, the goddess of the dawn. In Greek mythology she is personified as the one who brings the hope of a new day. The group’s founder chose this name as it referred to her desire to bring hope and new opportunities to the community of District Six.Despite working under the constraints of apartheid, the organisation provided a platform where gifted actors, musicians and dancers could express their life’s calling.“Their story is inspirational. It is time to celebrate their memory,” says Roos.For many people who had talent, this was their only chance.“This is why the organisation was so important,” she says. “It gave people an opportunity to develop their talent and perform, even if these were limited opportunities.“There is no other group like this.”Important memories preserved in printThrough the book the Eoan History Project hopes to preserve the organisation’s history for future generations.The publication tells the story of Eoan’s establishment, but also shows the impact of the apartheid government’s racial policies on South African communities.“What is extraordinary about this group is that there is just about no other example in the country where the evolution of a cultural group and the development of the apartheid regime are so closely linked,” Roos says.When the Eoan Group started, their headquarters were situated in District Six and 15 branches were established throughout the Cape Peninsula by the mid-1950s. They offered a wide range of activities that included ballet, folk dance, speech, drama, singing, painting and sewing.After the destruction of District Six, the group moved to their new premises, the Joseph Stone Theatre in Athlone.Years later, documents and photos of Eoan’s productions were found at the theatre. The photos, permits for performances, letters and programmes were organised into an archive which has been housed at the SU Music Department since 2008.Roos says many stories about the group and its members were undocumented for years, and numerous oral accounts of their activities appear in this book for the first time.The book is an oral history and includes extracts from 47 interviews which have been structured in a narrative around themes such as opera and ballet productions, and is complemented by photos and other archive material.The interviews were done mainly with former Eoan members, most of which sang in the group’s opera productions.A bittersweet storyDuring the 1950s, Eoan performed to mixed audiences. But Roos says the group’s activities became more restricted as apartheid intensified in the 1960s.“It had a major impact on their performances, but they kept going amid the political difficulties,” she says.Eventually apartheid legislation completely prohibited mixed audiences. To comply with these requirements, the group applied for permits to perform in the City Hall for mixed audiences from 1966 onwards.Roos says the group suffered a setback when they were forced to accept financial support from the apartheid government’s coloured affairs department, which caused their standing and support in the community to suffer.“They were forced into a tricky compromise,” she says. “They needed funding to put on performances but they also didn’t want to betray their community.”Despite these conditions, they remained successful and popular, and this was widely reflected in ticket sales and media coverage.Outstanding performances, against all oddsDuring their artistic peak from the 1950s to 1970s, the group often performed to packed houses in Cape Town’s best concert halls.Eoan performed the first full-length indigenous jazz ballet by a local composer for a South African ballet group. The Square by Stanley Glasser was about gang life in District Six.From 1956 until the late 1970s the group had an active amateur opera section which performed at arts festivals and annual opera seasons and toured throughout South Africa (1960 and 1965) and the United Kingdom (1975).In 1956 they performed Verdi’s La Traviata in the Cape Town City Hall, Eoan’s artistic home before apartheid legislation forced them to move to Athlone.By 1977 they had eleven operas in their repertoire: three by Verdi, Puccini’s Madame Butterfly and La Bohème, Johann Strauss’ Die Fledermaus, Bizet’s Carmen, Donizetti’s L’Elisir d’Amore, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci and Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana.Making a name overseasSome of Eoan’s members went on to build successful international careers.“Many of them went abroad, got bursaries and took their chance at better opportunities,” Roos says. “Some big names emerged from the group.”They were mostly dancers, but a handful of singers also made it overseas, despite not having access to good vocal training in South Africa.One of the group’s success stories is Vincent Hantam. According to Scotland’s National Centre for Dance, Hantam danced most of the principal roles with Scottish Ballet from 1975 to 1991, and has performed with many companies on the local and international stage.Tenor Joseph Gabriels was discovered by Joseph Manca, musical director of the Eoan Group.“He had an exceptional voice,” Roos says.He received no musical or vocal training while in South Africa, but in 1967 he secured a bursary from the Schneier family of Johannesburg to study in Milan.In 1969 he won the famous Verdi competition in Busseto. He made his debut in 1971 at the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Canio in I Pagliacci – the first South African to sing there.The Eoan Group stopped performing operas in 1977, but the company still exists today and they focus on dance productions.According to the team who compiled the book, the interviews with former Eoan members show how much people invested into the arts through the group, the extraordinary circumstances in which they had to operate, and the influential role that the group played in so many lives.last_img read more


first_imgAll India Congress Committee’s Punjab in-charge Asha Kumari on Tuesday sought a report from the party’s State unit over the face-off between Chief Minister Amarinder Singh and his Cabinet colleague Navjot Singh Sidhu. Mr. Sidhu is under fire from his own party leaders after during electioneering he questioned as to why no FIR was lodged against the Badals for the desecration of religious texts in 2015. “We seek a report on every event, and in this issue too a report has been sought from the PCC,” Ms. Kumari said. She said the State party chief Sunil Jakhar, who is seeking re-election from Gurdaspur, will give the report once he is free from the election process after the declaration of the results.Captain Amarinder on Sunday had accused Mr. Sidhu of “damaging” the party in the State and suggested that he wanted to be the CM himself.Support for CM Meanwhile, more party leaders came out in support of the Chief Minister. “Amarinder Singh is an undisputed leader of Punjab. There are many facets to his personality,” said former Union Minister and party leader Manish Tewari. He praised Capt. Amarinder as a “protector of Punjab’s waters”, a writer, an able administrator who has a mass appeal. Jails Minister Sukhjinder Singh Randhawa also hit out at the Local Bodies Minister, saying, “Making such a statement during elections meant directly helping the Badals.” He added that Mr. Sidhu should know that it was Amarinder Singh who fought against the Badals and ensured the Congress victory in the 2017 Assembly polls. “In the 2017 Assembly polls, the Congress came to power in Punjab with an overwhelming majority as people voted in Amarinder Singh’s name. The party high command is with the Chief Minister. Our party has never tolerated indiscipline,” Mr. Randhawa said.Mr. Randhawa also alleged that when Mr. Sidhu’s wife, Navjot Kaur, was a BJP MLA, she never spoke on the desecration issue.‘Unease in ranks’ Union Minister of State for Housing and Urban Affairs Hardeep Singh Puri, who is the BJP’s Lok Sabha candidate from Amritsar, took a jibe at the Congress, saying, “All along the campaign, one could sense unease in their ranks.” “Now the cat is out of the bag,” he tweeted.last_img read more


first_imgKalyani (West Bengal): Real Kashmir FC overcame the mental turmoil arising out of uncertain situations back home as they beat Chennai City FC 1-0 through a last minute goal in the 129th Durand Cup fixture here on Wednesday. A Danish Farooq long range strike in the 90th minute gave the ‘Snow Leopards’ a solitary goal win over the Chennai side. With a lockdown in force in Jammu and Kashmir in the aftermath of the scrapping of Article 370, Real Kashmir assembled for the first time this season here late Monday night only to realise they’re cut off from family members back home. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhBut it did not show in their performance as the David Robertson-coached side dominated against the reigning I-League champions who fielded a reserve side full of local players. The inexperience of Chennai City showed when goalkeeper Kabir T handled the ball outside the penalty box to be sent off in the 76th minute. Seizing on the numerical advantage over the Chennai side, Real Kashmir stepped on the attack and in the 90th minute their star player Farooq sent a powerful right footer from a long range, which beat substitute goalkeeper Prateek Singh all ends up. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced later”We play professional football. You have to be professional. These sort of things keep happening. Tomorrow something else may happen. Football teaches you how to tackle these situations and play well despite the odds,” Farooq said, reflecting on the situation back home. Showering praise on their Scottish coach, he said it’s Robertson job to keep the players in good mood despite all odds. “Our team atmosphere is like this only, all thanks to our coach. He keeps everyone in good mood and never let us bog down by any pressure. He plays a big role. He keeps motivating us. Don’t keep anything in mind just focus on the game,” said Farooq. “It’s our first match of the season. We never knew what would be our result and we assembled after a long time. So I’m sure this win will boost our confidence. There’s a positive atmosphere in the team,” he said. In their debut I-League season, Real Kashmir were in the title race at one stage before finishing third behind Chennai City and East Bengal. “Our off-season was going on and we met each other two days ago here at the hotel only. Our preparation just began with Durand Cup. Our main goal is I-league. This tournament will help us in getting fit,” he said. Hailed as the ‘Ronaldo of Kashmir’, Farooq had a stomach bug on the eve of the match as he struggled to get going early on a drenched afternoon here. Farooq and Subhas Singh both missed successive opportunities in a second minute move when the ball ricocheted off the post, in what was their best chance of the match. But Farooq finally made it count to seal the three points before the final whistle to keep their semifinal hopes alive. Dedicating the goal to the entire team members, support staff and owners, Farooq said: “They have been hardworking to make a good competitive team. They asked to put up a better show. We will try to do well in upcoming matches as well.” Real Kashmir play Army Green on August 10 and Chennai City will play FC Goa on August 14, both at Kalyani Stadium.last_img read more


first_imgJackie Chan has blogged about the importance of his Build A School For A Dollar project.“Every time I come back to Hong Kong, I get to see all the Build a School donations that children from all corners of the world send to me,” he blogged on his official website. “Some of you might be asking – why are they sending me money? Well, many years ago, I made a request to all the children around the world and started the Build a School for a dollar project. If everyone donates their pocket money or spare change to me, no matter how much or how little, even just one dollar, I will match every dollar with another dollar and use all your donations towards charity.“Over the years, my office has continuously received donations from children all over the world. This time, I saw that a group of students from Germany drew many Chinese paintings and auctioned them off as a charity fundraising event for my Build a School for a Dollar project. In the end, they raised $650 Euros and sent it to my office. Also, a group of children from America amazingly wrote a Chinese letter to me. I was so surprised! All donations received by these young children, and my promise to match every dollar with another dollar, will all be used towards building another Dragon’s Heart school.“I’m so happy to receive your continual support towards charity over the many years. You are the peace and hope of our future! Thank you all for making this world a better place and more heartwarming!”Find out more about Jackie Chan’s Build A School For A Dollar project here.Source:JackieChan.comlast_img read more


first_imgRanbir Kapoor and Deepika Padukone in Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani.Movie Still.Good news for fans of the Ranbir Kapoor-Deepika Padukone onscreen pair. The two superstars who are ex-lovers are all set to reunite on screen in a Bollywood film! If reports are to be believed, Ranbir Kapoor and Deepika Padukone will be seen on screen opposite each other in Luv Ranjan’s film produced by Bhushan Kumar of T-Series. The film also stars Ajay Devgn in the lead.Ranbir Kapoor and Deepika Padukone have done three films together – Bachna Ae Haseeno, Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani and Tamasha – the last two being after their famous breakup. The two exes have always been cordial with each other and never said no to work together, even if it’s an ad or a ramp walk.They just starred in an advertisement together, their first assignment with each other after Deepika Padukone got married to Ranveer Singh. Currently, there is a lot of buzz around the two couples of Ranbir Kapoor and Alia Bhatt, and Deepika Padukone and Ranveer Singh. The foursome’s camaraderie at the Zee Cine Awards 2019 was to be seen to be believed!Reports suggest that as couples, Ranbir Kapoor and Alia Bhatt, and Deepika Padukone and Ranveer Singh have landed a deal together for a showcase tour to the United States of America in 2020. That explains the recent display of over-friendliness between the exes and their respective partners.But fans are certainly interested in seeing Ranbir Kapoor and Deepika Padukone together on screen again, with their wonderful chemistry. Mumbai Mirror reports that you may get to watch them sharing screen space again. “Four years after Imtiaz Ali’s Tamasha in 2015, Deepika Padukone and Ranbir Kapoor will be reuniting for their fourth film together, Luv Ranjan’s yet-untitled next directorial,” says the tabloid.Deepika Padukone is currently producing Chhapaak, a film where she stars as acid attack survivor Laxmi Agarwal. The first look of the film received rave reviews. Ranbir Kapoor is busy with Brahmastra and Shamshera, while Ajay Devgn is gearing up for his big movie Tanhaji: The Unsung Warrior, which will now release on January 10, 2020.last_img read more


first_imgA space elevator would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, and then another 40,000 miles to a weighted structure for stability. And a space elevator – if it ever becomes reality – will be quite long. NASA needs about 144,000 miles of nanotube to build one. In theory, a cable would extend 22,000 miles above the Earth to a station, which is the distance at which satellites remain in geostationary orbit. Due to the competing forces of the Earth’s gravity and outward centrifugal pull, the elevator station would remain at that distance like a satellite. Then the cable would extend another 40,000 miles into space to a weighted structure for stability. An elevator car would be attached to the nanotube cable and powered into space along the track.NASA and its partner, the Spaceward Foundation, hope that a space elevator could serve as a cost-effective and relatively clean mode of space transportation. NASA’s current shuttle fleet is set to retire in 2010, and the organization doesn’t have enough funds to replace it until 2014 at the earliest. To fill the gap, NASA is hiring out shuttles to provide transportation to the International Space Station from private companies. So NASA could use a space elevator, the sooner the better. Space elevators could lift material at just one-fifth the cost of a rocket, since most of a rocket’s energy is used simply to escape Earth’s gravity. Not only could a space elevator offer research expeditions for astronauts, the technology could also expand the possibilities for space tourism and even space colonization.Currently, the Cambridge team can make about 1 gram of the new carbon material per day, which can stretch to 18 miles in length. Alan Windle, professor of materials science at Cambridge, says that industrial-level production would be required to manufacture NASA’s request for 144,000 miles of nanotube. Nevertheless, the web-like nanotube material is promising.”The key thing is that the process essentially makes carbon into smoke, but because the smoke particles are long thin nanotubes, they entangle and hold hands,” Windle said. “We are actually making elastic smoke, which we can then wind up into a fiber.”Windle and his colleagues presented their results last month at a conference in Luxembourg, which attracted hundreds of attendees from groups such as NASA and the European Space Agency. John Winter of EuroSpaceward, which organized the conference, thought the new material was a significant step.”The biggest problem has always been finding a material that is strong enough and lightweight enough to stretch tens of thousands of miles into space,” said Winter. “This isn’t going to happen probably for the next decade at least, but in theory this is now possible. The advances in materials for the tether are very exciting.”via: Times Online and Gizmodo© 2009 PhysOrg.com This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Solar weather has real, material effects on Earth Citation: Long, Stretchy Carbon Nanotubes Could Make Space Elevators Possible (2009, January 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-01-stretchy-carbon-nanotubes-space-elevators.html (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists from Cambridge University have developed a light, flexible, and strong type of carbon nanotube material that may bring space elevators closer to reality. Motivated by a $4 million prize from NASA, the scientists found a way to combine multiple separate nanotubes together to form long strands. Until now, carbon nanotubes have been too brittle to be formed into such long pieces.last_img read more