first_imgThe following statement is being issued today by Vermont Attorney General William H Sorrell and the Mortgage Foreclosure Multistate Group:”It has recently come to light that a number of mortgage loan servicers havesubmitted affidavits or signed other documents in support of either ajudicial or non-judicial foreclosure that appear to have procedural defects.In particular, it appears affidavits and other documents have been signed bypersons who did not have personal knowledge of the facts asserted in thedocuments. In addition, it appears that many affidavits were signed outsideof the presence of a notary public, contrary to state law. This process ofsigning documents without confirming their accuracy has come to beknown as “robo-signing.” We believe such a process may constitute adeceptive act and/or an unfair practice or otherwise violate state laws.In order to handle this issue in the most efficient and consistent mannerpossible, the states have formed a bi-partisan multistate group to addressissues common to a large number of states. The group is comprised of bothstate Attorneys General and the state bank and mortgage regulators.”Currently 49 state Attorneys General have joined this coordinatedmultistate effort. State bank and mortgage regulators are participating bothindividually and through their Multistate Mortgage Committee, whichrepresents mortgage regulators from all 50 states. Through this process, thestates will attempt to speak with one voice to the greatest extent possible.”At the end of this statement is a list of the participating states.Our multistate group has begun inquiring whether or not individualmortgage servicers have improperly submitted affidavits or otherdocuments in support of foreclosures in our states. The facts uncovered inour review will dictate the scope of our inquiry.”The Executive Committeeis comprised of the following Attorneys General Offices: Arizona,California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, New York, NorthCarolina, Ohio, Texas, and Washington; and the following state bankingregulators: Maryland Office of the Commissioner of Financial Regulation,New York State Banking Department, and the Pennsylvania Department ofBanking.”Source: Vermont AG. 10.12.2010.Participating Attorneys GeneralAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelawareFloridaGeorgiaHawaii Department of the Attorney General / Hawaii Office of Consumer ProtectionIdahoIllinoisIndianaIowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMarylandMassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew HampshireNew JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth DakotaOhioOklahomaOregonPennsylvaniaRhode IslandSouth CarolinaSouth DakotaTennesseeTexasUtahVermontVirginiaWashingtonWest VirginiaWisconsinWyomingParticipating State Bank and Mortgage RegulatorsArizona Department of Financial InstitutionsArkansas Securities DepartmentConnecticut Department of BankingD.C. Department of Insurance Securities and BankingFlorida Office of Financial RegulationIdaho Department of FinanceIllinois Secretary of Financial and Professional RegulationIndiana Department of Financial InstitutionsIowa Division of BankingKentucky Department of Financial InstitutionsLouisiana Office of Financial InstitutionsMaine Bureau of Consumer Credit ProtectionMaine Bureau of Financial InstitutionsMaryland Office of the Commissioner of Financial RegulationDivision of Banks, Commonwealth of MassachusettsMichigan Office of Financial & Insurance RegulationMinnesota Department of CommerceMississippi Department of Banking and Consumer FinanceMontana Division of Banking and Financial InstitutionsNebraska Department of Banking and FinanceNevada Financial Institutions Division and Mortgage Lending DivisionNew Hampshire Banking DepartmentNew Jersey Department of Banking & Insurance – Office of Consumer FinanceNew York State Banking DepartmentNorth Carolina Commissioner of BanksNorth Dakota Department of Financial InstitutionsOhio Division of Financial InstitutionsOregon Department of Consumer and Business Services – Division of Financeand Corporate SecuritiesPennsylvania Department of BankingRhode Island Department of Business Regulation – Division of BankingSouth Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs Tennessee Department ofFinancial Institutions Texas Department of BankingTexas Finance Commission and Consumer Credit Commissioner VermontDepartment of Banking, Insurance, Securities and Health CareAdministrationWashington State Department of Financial InstitutionsWest Virginia Division of Banking WisconsinDepartment of Banking Wyoming Division of Bankinglast_img read more


first_imgCan CU finance people who remember the Great Recession rely on their experience handling that one to get their organizations through the current slowdown? A little? Not at all? The answer may depend on who you ask.Derek Fuzzell, CPA, CMA, CSCA, doesn’t think lessons learned in the 2008 recession apply now.“Nothing repeats exactly, but the Great Depression is a better model for what to expect,” says the CUES member and CFO of $240 million PAHO/WHO Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C. He’s a student of history who has studied the Depression.“The Great Recession hit the financial sector hard, but restaurants stayed open,” he notes. “Stores stayed open. The people who worked there got paid and paid their bills. Lots of people continued as usual, and they saved the economy. The finance people who lost their jobs weren’t big spenders anyway. This will hit harder. I’m looking more at the Great Depression for guidance.” continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


first_imgStuff.co 23 October 2013Sixty children a day are being abused, with few signs that New Zealand’s appalling record of caring for our young is improving.Latest figures show there were 21,778 substantiated child abuse claims in the year to June, slightly more than in the previous year.Social Development Minister Paula Bennett said it was still early days in the fight against child abuse.“The fact that children are being seriously abused and neglected at such high rates proves in itself that our priority and attention should be on them,” she said.Children’s Commissioner Russell Wills said the number showed the public’s tolerance for violence against women and children still had a way to go.“One is too many and 22,000 is a very high number . . . We need it to come down,” he said.BY THE NUMBERS148,209 notifications of child abuse or neglect21,778 cases of substantiated abuse12,072 of emotional abuse5104 of neglect3190 of assault1412 of sexual abuse17,181 children abused 2309 children abused more than once in the past six months37 children abused under state care.http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9314332/Child-abuse-is-rising-in-NZlast_img read more


first_imgAnd yet, as the Kop sensed another memorable Champions League victory, Adrian – deputising for the injured Alisson – paid the price for a dreadful clearance as substitute Marcos Llorente pounced with a low finish to secure Atletico’s crucial away goal.Llorente struck again with another composed finish in the 105th minute and with the spirit draining out of Liverpool and their supporters, former Chelsea striker Alvaro Morata adding insult to injury with a third in the dying seconds to send Atletico through to the last eight.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Liverpool’s hold on the Champions League was wrestled from them by Atletico Madrid on Wednesday night after a dramatic last-16 second leg went into extra time – and a finely balanced game turned on a catastrophic blunder by goalkeeper Adrian.Jurgen Klopp’s side – seeking to win the trophy for a seventh time – thought they had overturned Atletico’s 1-0 advantage from the first leg when Roberto Firmino’s first goal at Anfield this season at the start of the added 30 minutes gave them the lead in the tie.Georginio Wijnaldum’s first-half header was full reward for Liverpool laying siege to the Atletico goal for much of the first 90 minuteslast_img read more


first_img A birdie-three on the 17th hole provided the key to Mark Willis winning the Fullers London Pride Gold Medal in the closest finish in the history of the 17-year history of the popular event for club golfers. It help the 34 year old from the Kendleshire club in Bristol to return 34 Stableford points over the Hotchkin course at Woodhall Spa for an aggregate of 70. That left him tied with playing partner Aiden Tanner from Norwich, who also signed for 34. So a card countback was needed to decide the winner. Both scored 15 points on the back nine, both recorded ten over the back six, but Willis’ birdie at 17 helped give him eight points over the back three compared to Tanner’s seven. It couldn’t have been closer and Willis even managed to get up-and-down from behind a bunker then sink a 15-foot putt on the last hole to save par or the first prize would have slipped away. “That was the longest putt I’d holed all day,” said Willis. “But I’m very surprised but proud to have won. I’m surprised because my game has not been good coming into the event so I didn’t think I’d be in the hunt. “But I think the course and the wind helped me as it made conditions difficult for everyone else. My putter was cold all weekend but it came good when I needed it.” Compared to the first day, conditions improved with a lot of sunshine but the wind gradually increased to be quite strong towards the end, a factor reflected in the scoring. Tanner, the 16 year old from the Costessey Park club, was naturally disappointed but he was disappointed by his form over the back nine. “I messed up on the back nine but Mark played well and deserved to win.” Third place was also decided on countback, Rob Sims from Bulbury Woods in Dorset edging out overnight leader Justin Brassell after both finished with 69 points. Sims, 60 year old warehouseman from Corfe Mullen, recorded 36 points in his second round to Brassell’s 32 and said: “The putts went in today. But I also drove the ball well and my plan was to play for position and I only found two bunkers.” The nine-handicapper had four birdies on his card but was annoyed to not score on the final hole. 18 Aug 2013 Crucial birdie tips the balance in Willis’s favour last_img read more