first_imgBy Dialogo April 01, 2010 After a fifty-two-day voyage, the tank landing ship (LST) Almirante Saboia docked at the naval base in Rio de Janeiro, returning from Haiti. The ship transported approximately 700 tons of humanitarian-aid and logistical-support material for the Brazilian Marines and the Brazilian Army, including water, clothing, tents, mattresses, canned food, various medicines, Piranha amphibious vehicles, 5-ton trucks, refrigerated trucks, tanker trucks, and Land Rovers. While the ship remained near the Haitian capital of Port-au-Prince, two Brazilian Navy planes, a UH-12 and a UH-14, which had been carrying out joint operations with the Italian aircraft carrier Cavour since the end of January 2010, were incorporated into its contingent.last_img read more


first_imgBy Dialogo April 05, 2013 “Approximately 52 individuals were arrested on federal narcotics and money laundering charges, and approximately 51 individuals were arrested on state narcotics and related charges.” US law enforcement authorities arrested more than 100 people on March 3, in what was described as a “massive operation” against heroin and cocaine traffickers from the Caribbean into Connecticut. “This morning, more than 700 law enforcement officers involved in the operation executed scores of federal and state arrest and arrest warrants in Connecticut, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Puerto Rico,” the federal prosecutor’s office for Connecticut said. “We allege that the defendants arrested today were responsible for a very large percentage of the heroin and cocaine available for street sale in New London County,” said US Attorney David Fein. center_img The alleged ring was importing “wholesale amounts of drugs” to Connecticut. Most of the defendants would face prison sentences of between five and 10 years if found guilty. The wave of arrests followed a 15-month investigation into the trafficking of the drugs from Puerto Rico and the nearby Dominican Republic. Authorities built their case on wiretaps of 15 telephones, physical surveillance and undercover purchases of cocaine and heroin, the US attorney’s office said. last_img read more


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A woman was robbed and nearly raped in a parking lot near a housing complex, office buildings and Nassau Community College early Wednesday morning, Nassau County police said.The victim was walking in a parking lot in the vicinity of Stewart Avenue and Selfridge Avenue in East Garden City when she was attacked from behind by a man who stole her jewelry and tried to sexually assault her at 5:30 a.m., police said.The suspect then fled in an unknown direction. The victim was taken to a local hospital, where she was treated for her injuries and released.Special Victims Squad detectives said the suspect is described as a black man between 5-feet, 7-inches and 6-feet tall with a medium build wearing black pants and black shoes.Detectives request that anyone with information regarding this crime to call the Nassau County Police Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS.last_img read more


first_imgA recent survey showed that credit unions and their members are looking for different things from their credit cards. In fact, 76% credit union card goals were aimed toward growth, while the rest prioritized member services. But here’s the rub: 100% of members polled listed “false declines” as their number one service issue for credit cards. Clearly, there’s a disconnect between member experience and credit union card goals. Growth is a good end goal but making sure existing cardholders feel taken care of is paramount for retention.  There is nothing more frustrating to a member than a false decline in the middle of a busy day. Why Card Declines are a Problem Speaking from personal experience, I know how frustrating a false decline is. Recently, an old friend came through town. We caught up over drinks and because we were on my home turf, I offered to pick up the tab. My card was declined. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more


first_imgCan CU finance people who remember the Great Recession rely on their experience handling that one to get their organizations through the current slowdown? A little? Not at all? The answer may depend on who you ask.Derek Fuzzell, CPA, CMA, CSCA, doesn’t think lessons learned in the 2008 recession apply now.“Nothing repeats exactly, but the Great Depression is a better model for what to expect,” says the CUES member and CFO of $240 million PAHO/WHO Federal Credit Union in Washington, D.C. He’s a student of history who has studied the Depression.“The Great Recession hit the financial sector hard, but restaurants stayed open,” he notes. “Stores stayed open. The people who worked there got paid and paid their bills. Lots of people continued as usual, and they saved the economy. The finance people who lost their jobs weren’t big spenders anyway. This will hit harder. I’m looking more at the Great Depression for guidance.” continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


first_imgChicago-based Boeing was already contending with a drop in advance payments from customers of its 737 Max aircraft, grounded after two crashes. Now that plane is nearing a return to service at a time when few airlines want new aircraft.The collapse in long-range flying threatens another critical source of cash for Boeing: deliveries of its 787 Dreamliners, which can carry passengers from Sydney to Chicago without refueling.Boeing said it is closely monitoring the market and customer needs. The company has already drawn down $7.5 billion of the $13.8 billion it borrowed in January to help bolster cash until the Max is back in the market.“Managing our liquidity and balance sheet are key focus areas,” a spokesman said, adding that it will “assess all levers to help provide adequate liquidity as we navigate the current challenges.”During periods of tumult, Toulouse, France-based Airbus sets up what it describes as a “watch tower.” That involves devoting extra personnel to help distressed customers delay aircraft orders, as well as letting opportunistic buyers jump the line. The company was able to move more than 600 orders around in this way between 2009 and 2011, following the last global economic shock.The European plane manufacturer is using the same system to manage coronavirus impact, as “commercial, production and finance teams monitor a number of parameters on a daily, weekly and monthly basis,” a spokesman said.Plunging trafficAirline traffic is expected to contract this year for only the fourth time since the Great Depression, although the full impact will depend on how long the Covid-19 virus continues to spread, said Ron Epstein, an analyst with Bank of America Corp. Oil prices are also plunging after Saudi Arabia decided to remove pricing curbs, giving airlines less incentive to trade in older, less fuel-efficient models.“We’re deflating from a very high altitude and that’s concerning,” said Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with Teal Group. “We’ve had one very bad year of traffic, and it’s going to be followed by an even worse year of traffic.”On the sidelines of last week’s ISTAT Americas conference of aircraft financiers, manufacturers and operators in Austin, Texas, executives looked for parallels to the industry slump that lasted two years after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. During that span, the compound annual growth rate of revenue for Boeing and Airbus and their constellation of suppliers was about minus 11 percent, by Aboulafia’s calculation.The correction would be more devastating if airlines’ hadn’t already cut back because of other problems: The 737 Max grounding last year, industrial foul-ups that have delayed Airbus’s narrow-body jets and durability issues that have plagued the three major jet engine manufacturers, said consultant Adam Pilarski, former chief economist for McDonnell Douglas before it merged with Boeing.“If all the airplanes that were ordered that were supposed to be delivered would have come, this bubble would’ve been enormous,” Pilarski said. “But we started deflating it by having incompetent manufacturers. Luckily it’s all of them.”Airline failures?Still, United President Scott Kirby is among those warning there will be more airline failures, particularly outside of the U.S. When carriers shut down, they leave behind fleets of used planes – further crimping demand for new models.“Airlines are desperate to cut capacity, costs and crew, but cannot do it quickly enough,” said Shukor Yusof, founder of aviation consultant Endau Analytics in Malaysia. “There will soon be airlines going out of business.”Others are more optimistic, noting that other outbreaks ended in a matter of months, and pent-up demand for travel will return. Over more than a half century, commercial aviation has weathered so-called “black swan” events where air traffic stalls, only to come back stronger in the end, said John Plueger, CEO of Air Lease Corp., the largest publicly traded US aircraft lessor.“There’s no doubt in my mind that this, too, shall pass,” he said.But with China reeling and globalization waning, the 2020s are likely to be a sobering comedown from the frothy era that followed the 2008 financial crisis.“We’re into a decade of cooling the jets and sticking to the knitting,” Avolon’s Slattery said. “I think it’s a decade of growth, but I don’t think it’s the pace we saw over the last decade.” Boeing Co. and Airbus SE, which until recently couldn’t make planes fast enough to satisfy airlines, are suddenly contending with the opposite risk: churning out jets with no buyers.Demand for new aircraft is drying up as customers wary of the coronavirus shun air travel, ending the longest boom in aviation history. That 16-year surge began as airlines emerged from another infectious disease crisis, the one related to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS. Now the new virus points to leaner times.In less than a month, the tumult has clipped about US$175 billion in market value from the US aerospace industry, a critical source of American exports. And the future looks just as grim. Passenger revenues could drop as much as $113 billion this year if the virus spreads extensively, according to the International Air Transport Association, the largest global airline trade group. Topics :center_img “I personally think it will get worse before it gets better,” said Domhnal Slattery, chief executive officer of Avolon, the third-largest global aircraft leasing company.Boeing and Airbus, which were rolling in cash while airlines went on a $1.15 trillion buying binge stretching back to 2008, are now intently focused on preserving capital and avoiding making “white tails.” That’s the industry term for buyer-less aircraft. Even well heeled carriers such as Delta Air Lines Inc. and United Airlines Holdings Inc., are carefully assessing plans to add new jetliners.Travel restrictions related to the pandemic are preventing airline representatives from China, the biggest international market for new airplanes, from even visiting Boeing’s delivery center in Seattle or Airbus’s in France to test-fly and sign ownership papers for new jets.Other criseslast_img read more


first_imgThink about it …Alabama and LSU are both candidates to get in the Playoff, regardless of what happens Saturday. But the Tigers should be a little more wary of the short history of the rankings. Alabama has opened in the top four of the rankings in every season except 2014 — when they were knocked out in the Sugar Bowl by Ohio State.LSU, meanwhile, opened in the top four in the first time. A look at the other SEC schools that were in that spot in the first poll reveals a tough trend:YearTeamWL2014Auburn852014Ole Miss942014Mississippi State1032016Texas A&M852017Georgia1322018Georgia113Those schools finished a combined 59-22 — an average of almost four losses per team. That is one trend LSU will hope to buck in the final month of the season. MORE: Will Tagovailoa play vs. LSU?That is one of three games between ranked teams. No. 5 Penn State travels to No. 13 Minnesota in a battle of Big Ten unbeatens (noon, ABC), and No. 18 Iowa travels to No. 16 Wisconsin (4 p.m., FOX).Every week, Sporting News will survey the landscape looking for Heisman contenders, coaches on the spot, upset alerts and other trends. With that in mind, get ready for Week 11:Heisman watchLet’s hope that Tagovailoa matchup materializes, which would add the Heisman layer to the Alabama-LSU matchup. Keep in mind that the quarterbacks who have finished No. 1 and No. 2 in the Heisman voting have met twice this century in the regular season.Tagovailoa (2,166 yards, 27 touchdowns, two interceptions) ranks second in the FBS in passer rating at 212.4, one spot ahead of Burrow (2,805 yards, 30 touchdowns, four interceptions) at 204.5. This one should to be a high-scoring affair like those other regular-season shootouts.In 2008, Oklahoma’s Sam Bradford (28 of 39, 387 yards, five touchdowns, two interceptions) and Texas’ Colt McCoy (28 of 35, 277 yards, touchdown) put on a show in the Longhorns’ 45-35 victory. In 2016, Clemson’s Deshaun Watson (20 of 31, 306 yards, five touchdowns, three interceptions) and Louisville’s Lamar Jackson (27 of 44, 295 yards, touchdown, interception) did the same in the Tigers’ 42-36 victory. In both cases, the Heisman winner was on the losing team while the losing quarterback played for a national championship.Makes sense, right?Coach on the spotThis is LSU coach Ed Orgeron’s big moment on the big stage, and he could solidify Coach of the Year candidacy with a victory against the Crimson Tide.Orgeron has a chance to deliver LSU’s first victory against Alabama since the No. 1-vs.-No. 2 showdown in 2011. That was the last time Les Miles beat Alabama and part of a stretch from 2011-13 where he was 1-3 against the Crimson Tide and 32-4 against everybody else.So far, Orgeron is 0-3 against Alabama and 30-6 against everybody else.Upset alertBaylor is putting its undefeated record on the line against TCU this weekend, and the Bears have not won this game since the legendary 61-58 shootout in 2014 that ended up keeping both teams out of the College Football Playoff.TCU coach Gary Patterson offered a small jab this week, too.Gary Patterson on the TCU-Baylor rivalry: “You go all the way back to the SWC ties … It was heated back in 2014-2015 and it’s calmed down, but think it will pick back up. I haven’t been getting as much Twitter rebuttal as I was a few years ago.”— Dean Straka (@DWStraka49) November 5, 2019The Horned Frogs are 3-1 at home — the lone loss a 41-38 shootout with SMU on Sept. 21. TCU averages 41.3 points per game at home. Baylor better be careful here.WEEK 11 PICKS: Straight up | Against the spreadOver/underMinnesota can take control of the Big Ten West with a home upset of Penn State on Saturday under third-year coach P.J. Fleck. The Gophers have a two-game lead on Wisconsin and Iowa — and the loser of that game will be all-but eliminated from the division race with three weeks left in the regular season.The Gophers beat Wisconsin 37-15 last season, too. Minnesota will play three ranked teams in the final four weeks and could potentially face Ohio State in the Big Ten championship game. Keep in mind Iowa went undefeated in the regular season in 2015 and Wisconsin followed in 2017. Is this Minnesota’s turnRemember, a 13-0 Big Ten champion is 100 percent getting in the Playoff. Week 11 of the college football season features the biggest matchup of the regular season — and a lot more.No. 1 LSU travels to No. 2 Alabama in a regular-season “Game of the Century” at Bryant-Denny Stadium. That game between the Tigers and Crimson Tide features SEC West and College Football Playoff implications, and the duel between quarterbacks Joe Burrow and Tua Tagovailoa — if he plays — could decide the Heisman Trophy.last_img read more


first_imgSubmitted by Barb Lally for Rob Rice HomesThe Rice family believes in giving back to the community they love.Throughout the entire year Rob Rice and his family generously provide time and support for organizations where they can make a real difference.“We feel it is our responsibility to give back to the community where we have been building homes for more than 30 years,” says Rob. “This is where we live, work and raise our children, and we want to help make it a better place for our family and those in the communities we build.”Their efforts extend far beyond issuing a check to the causes they believe in, they back their support with real action. In 2011 Rob and his wife Helena had determined that they needed to specify a goal for annual giving so they made the decision to prioritize children’s needs and homeless pets as causes to help. Now they extend their hands and hearts to two organizations that improve the lives of children and that aid rescue animals.“There are so many well-deserving charities in our community but we needed to pinpoint two so we could really make a difference,” says Helena.Caring for Animals“When I married Rob, I had three rescue dogs and he was living in a pet-free home; it was quite a change for him,” laughs Helena, who grew up in a family that has always helped animals in need. “It didn’t take long though and within a few months he was traveling around with one of my dogs and even taking her to the office to work for the day.”Now she says Rob has a soft heart for rescue animals, even picking them up in communities where he builds to make sure they get to their“Lewis” was lucky to be rescued by Rob Rice on I-5.homes or a shelter where they can be helped.“Just recently Rob stopped on I-5 on the North Fork Lewis River Bridge in Clark County when he saw a confused dog running in the freeway,” Helena says. “Rob had to crawl underneatha truck to eventually get the poor thing out. Rob brought the dog home, took him for veterinary care and we took care of him until we found the perfect owner. One of our staff is now the dog’s proud owner so Rob still gets to see ‘Lewis’ who is named after the bridge where he was rescued.”Every year, the Rice’s, along with other business owners, sponsor a fundraising auction for Concern for Animals, an organization that for 34 years has assisted low income families with the food and medical needs of their pets and rescue animals. But they wanted to do more.“Rob and Helena met with us and asked how they could help us,” says Janey Hanson president of Concern for Animals. “We had bought an older 1920s home for our offices after operating out of people’s homes for years. We showed them our lengthy wish list so they could pick a project. What happened next was amazing.”The new Concern for Animals building was completely remodeled by Rob Rice and his sub-contractors at no charge.Janey says that the local builder sought the help of many of his sub-contractors who donated their time and materials to completely remodel the home. Rob even assigned one of his superintendents to coordinate the work. The long list of sub-contractors who contributed is on the group’s website.“They cleaned out our project wish list,” says Janey. “They even sent in a designer so we could pick our color pallet. They remodeled the kitchen with new flooring, cabinets, counters and backsplash; they fixed a major drainage problem under the house and repaired the basement so we had plenty of room for our food bank. They painted, fixed our ceiling, worked on our heating system and did electrical work and even leveled our parking lot. The list is long.”The group says it would have taken years to complete but Rob and his sub-contractors did it all in just a few months resulting in an office and food bank that will help hundreds of pet owners and their animals.Contributing to Kids “Our son Alex attended the Hands On Children’s Museum of Olympia school for 3 years,” says Helena. “When Rob and I went to his first parent-teacher conference, we realized what a unique learning atmosphere it is and how beneficial the museum is to children in our community, so we decided we wanted to donate our time and resources to this great institution.”Helena began co-chairing the museum’s fundraising breakfast that provides admission for Free Friday Night and then when the new museum was in design stages both she and Rob agreed to provide an entire exhibit that offers kids an experience in construction, a field they know a bit about. The Build It! exhibit allows children to don hard hats and safety goggles while they use builder boards to build a home or they create a Keva structure.Around the CommunityThe Build It! exhibit, contributed by the Rice’s, gets rave reviews at the Hands on Children’s Museum.There are many other organizations where Helena and Rob donate their time and resources.Rob is a lifetime director for the Olympia Master Builders Association and an active board member of Thurston Economic Development Council. He is also well known for presiding over the Home Owners Associations in the communities he builds to help maintain their quality and value.Rob is a founder of Thurston First Bank, initially helping to start the bank and currently chairing several committees for its board. Helena is a shareholder in the bank as well.Helena has served on boards for the Pacific Mountain Workforce Development Council and the Thurston County Chamber of Commerce and currently volunteers for the PTO program at East Olympia Elementary, Alex’s school.The Rice’s support Saint Martin’s University, Boys & Girls Clubs of Thurston County and the South Sound YMCA and Rob coaches most of his children’s sports teams, whether it is basketball, football or baseball.Helena admits it all keeps them very busy yet they don’t usually turn away requests for help.“We feel overjoyed to help out this amazing community,” she says. “It is a proven fact that people who give are happier and healthier. That is sure true in our family’s case.”Rob Rice is Thurston County’s largest local home builder and was voted the Best of South Sound for 2013. He has built more than 3000 homes over the last 30 years. He and his wife Helena live in Olympia with their two sons; Alex Michael and Carson. Rob is a graduate of Washington State University with degrees in construction management and architecture. Facebook25Tweet0Pin0last_img read more


first_imgThree of the members have Brier experience.So does two of the first two rinks the Shypitka team plays against to open the eight-team spiel  — Craig Lepine of Langley and Mel Steffin of New Westminster.“We feel confident, we have a lot of experience on the team,” Thomson explained. “We can play an aggressive game and if we get up a little bit we have the skills to hopefully keep things pretty clean.”Day two Team Shypitka meets the other Kootenay rep in the tournament, Castlegar’s Myron Nichol.Joining Nichol is third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz. The Sunflower City rink opens Tuesday against Wes Craig of Victoria and Rick Pughe of New Westminster.Each team plays two games each day with the top three teams advancing to Saturday’s playoff round. Friday is set aside for tie-breakers.The top teams automatically gains a spot in Saturday’s final while the second and third squads battle to advance into the championship.“Playoffs would be ideal, finishing first would be even better,” Thomson explained.“You might get away with three losses to get into a playoff but four losses and your probably done. If you can go through with one or two losses I think you’ll have a pretty shot at finishing first.”EXTRA END: The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks is the lone rep for the Kootenays in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Championships held at the same time as the men’s in Trail. Hiram is joined by third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead Cindy Pettapiece. Fred Thomson would like to think all his years of competing in the Trail Curling Club would give his team the edge heading into play Tuesday at the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Men’s Championships.That may be the case, say, at the junior level.This is the Senior Men’s Division where skips, thirds, seconds and leads have seen more ice than an Eskimo.“It’s not going to be easy at all,” said Thomson, playing third for the Kootenay’s top seed, the Tom Shypitka rink of Cranbrook.“I understand (Trail committee) has brought in a different icemaker so he’s probably going to change up the ice somewhat.”“Plus (our rink) doesn’t see a lot of each other during the year . . . we don’t practice we don’t throw rocks together so I don’t think there will be a whole lot of home ice advantage for us.”Thomson, is joined by skip Tom Shypitka of Cranbrook, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale.last_img read more