first_imgBangalore-based pharmaceutical company Biocon on Thursday reported its result for the first quarter of the financial year 2016-17. The firm’s net profit rose 35 percent to Rs. 166.6 crore as compared to Rs. 123.9 crore during the same quarter in the last financial year, the company said in its regulatory filing to the Bombay Stock Exchange. Biocon’s consolidated net revenues for the June quarter rose 21 percent to Rs. 982 crore as compared to Rs. 813.9 crore during the same time in the previous fiscal. “Our strong performance this quarter has been driven by an all-round growth of our business across small molecules, biologics, branded formulations and research services,” Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw, the Chairperson and Managing Director of Biocon, said. Biocon’s Biologics business delivered a growth of 53 percent, which was driven by the sales of Biosimilars in emerging markets. The company’s insulin business also got a boost with the launch of its Insulin Glargine in Japan.Biocon has received regulatory approvals from the ministry of health, Malaysia, for rh-Insulin and Glargine, which would enable commercialisation of these products.”We are on track for filing some of our Biosimilars and Generic Formulations in the developed market later this year,” Shaw added.The company’s net sales for the quarter that ended on June 30 was recorded at Rs. 972 crore as against Rs. 757 crore during the corresponding quarter in the previous fiscal.The Biocon Limited stock was trading at Rs. 745.10 at around 10:18 a.m. on Friday, up 6.22 percent from its previous close on the BSE.last_img read more


first_img IT majors to lay off at least 56,000 employees this year Jack of all trades, master of none? Well, that’s not a bad thing, especially in the current corporate scenario when most companies these days prefer to hire employees who can handle multiple tasks. Hiring experts have said that a large number of employers these days shortlist candidates who are generalists and not specialists, especially for entry level jobs.While a specialist might be an efficient employee in a department or two and may have brilliant ideas, a generalist can be trained in a number of things, which is beneficial to the company in the long run. Also, with the right training and guidance, a generalist will not take much time to specialise in a specific department.”A decade ago, specialists were in demand, but today, companies want generalists. The liberal arts degree which was extremely unpopular is now in demand. This is because companies today are looking for trainable people,” the Times of India quoted Paul Dupuis, MD & CEO, Randstad India, as saying.Even though some sectors do need specialists, it is easier to find a job when an employee is a generalist, as he can then be trained and moulded as per the requirement.”While earlier at the time of hiring one would lay emphasis on specific qualifications — at the entry level —employers are focusing more on cognitive abilities than on specialisation. Liberal arts students have an edge in this new world because they are taught not to conform — to challenge facts, to have divergent view points, to seek solutions rather than prescribe one,” Rituparna Chakraborty, executive VP and co-founder, TeamLease Services, explained to the daily. A woman holds her resume at TechFair LA, a technology job fair, in Los AngelesReutersShe also said that in the last two years, TeamLease has noted that most IT companies prefer to hire graduates over engineers in similar salary brackets as graduates can be trained in a number of other things.Meanwhile, the IT companies are also witnessing another shift. Amid a wave of layoff that has hit the IT sector, firms are keen on hiring consultants and freelancers, instead of regular employees. Also called the “gig economy” or “Uberisation” of workforce, companies are said to be hiring workers in a demand-supply model. “While this (Uberisation) isn’t seen yet at a mass level with services companies, it is starting to happen,” the Economic Times quoted Sameer Bendre, chief people officer at Persistent Systems, as saying.”There are a few pockets where we are experimenting with it… We believe that there are a lot of opportunities in some areas for us to use it, like women returning to work after maternity leave.” Closelast_img read more


first_img High-Flying Electrons May Provide New Test of Quantum Theory (PhysOrg.com) — When Enrico Fermi investigated the Rydberg atom in the ’30s, he never imagined that the giant atoms could form molecules. Later, in the ’70s and ’80s, theoretical physicist Chris Greene predicted that Rydberg molecules could exist. But it wasn’t until recent advancements in ultracold physics that such an observation has been made possible. A recent study now shows that the Rydberg molecule can be created in the lab, and its observation supports decades of theory. Explore further In a paper published in Nature, scientists from the University of Stuttgart in Germany and the University of Oklahoma in the US explain how they have created Rydberg molecules with a calculated lifetime of 18 microseconds. Their Rydberg molecule consists of two rubidium atoms, one a Rydberg atom and one a groundstate atom. Connected by a very weak chemical bond, the two atoms are separated by about 100 nm (several thousand Bohr radii), which makes them much farther apart than atoms in most other molecules.As opposed to groundstate atoms, Rydberg atoms are excited atoms that have one electron in an outermost orbit very far from the nucleus (a state with a very high principal quantum number). For this reason, Rydberg atoms are large and can exhibit unusually long-range interactions. For example, scientists have previously investigated the bonding of two Rydberg atoms, which occurs across very large internuclear distances.In the current study, the scientists investigated a different bonding interaction, which occurs between a Rydberg electron and a groundstate atom. As the researchers explain, this bond arises from the low-energy scattering of the Rydberg electron with the negative scattering length from a groundstate atom when the atoms are at a specific location within the Rydberg electron wavefunction. To observe these giant molecules, the researchers prepared a magnetically trapped sample of ultracold rubidium atoms. As the rubidium cloud cooled, the atoms in the gas moved closer together. At temperatures close to absolute zero (-273°C), the atoms’ nuclei were separated by the critical distance of 100 nanometers. The researchers then excited some of the atoms to the Rydberg state with a laser. “If we have a gas at the critical density, with two atoms at the correct distance that are able to form the molecule, and we excite one to the Rydberg state, then we can form a molecule,” said Vera Bendkowsky of the University of Stuttgart, lead author of the study. Using spectroscopic techniques, the researchers could investigate these exotic molecular states, such as determining the 18-microsecond lifetime of the molecules. The experimental results agree well with predictions, confirming long-held fundamental atomic theories. Based on the results of their spectroscopic characterization, the scientists predict that other states could be realized and investigated in the near future. One possibility is the realization of “trilobite molecules,” which are bound states involving a Rydberg electron with large angular momentum.More information: Vera Bendkowsky, Bjorn Butscher, Johannes Nipper, James P. Shaffer, Robert Low & Tilman Pfau. “Observation of ultralong-range Rydberg molecules.” Nature, Vol 458, 23 April 2009, doi:10.1038/nature07945.via: BBC News© 2009 PhysOrg.com Citation: Scientists Make First Observation of Unique Rydberg Molecule (2009, April 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-scientists-unique-rydberg-molecule.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Johannes Rydberg, the physicist whom the Rydberg atom is named after. Credit: AIP Emilio Segre Visual Archives, W. F. Meggers Collection. last_img read more