first_img By: J.J. Abbott, Deputy Press Secretary BLOG: How DOC is Helping Inmates with Mental Illness Transition Home (Round-up) Criminal Justice Reform,  Round-Up,  The Blog Yesterday, Department of Corrections officials highlighted a state-run, first-of-its-kind unit at the Wernersville Community Corrections Center that helps individuals with mental illness transition home following incarceration. At the media event, reporters were given a tour of the 32-bed unit and interviewed employees and center residents.“We are proud of our efforts to address the behavioral health needs of those who are incarcerated in Pennsylvania,” said Corrections Secretary John Wetzel. “With fully one-quarter of all of those entering prisons in Pennsylvania diagnosed with mental illness and nine percent of those struggling with serious mental illness, it is imperative that the department develop the best possible programming to help them succeed when they return to the community. We anticipate that Pathways Transitional Wellness Center will become a model facility for other states.”Take a look at the additional coverage below: May 18, 2016 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Philadelphia Inquirer: Helping mentally ill inmates find their way home“When Henry Hamm, a 61-year-old Lancaster man who has schizophrenia, finished serving time for writing a bad check, he was sent to a new program designed to help offenders with serious mental illnesses rejoin the outside world. He joined Pathways Transitional Wellness Center, which connects mentally ill parolees to social and medical services, housing, and jobs before they try to make it on their own. Three months later, he’s a fan of the nine-month-old Department of Corrections program, which is housed in a boxy, utilitarian building on the grounds of Wernersville State Hospital, about nine miles southwest of Reading.”Allentown Morning Call: State touts reentry program for seriously mentally ill inmates“As a state prison inmate with serious mental illness, 61-year-old Henry Hamm represents one of the biggest challenges that Pennsylvania’s corrections system faces. Hamm, who is serving a 2- to 4-year sentence in Lancaster County for felony theft, is diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Too often, the extra hurdles he faces would make his time as a prisoner a difficult one, and one in which he risked returning to the streets no better able to cope with his problems than when he left. Enter a first-of-its-kind program at a halfway house run by the Department of Corrections on the campus of Wernersville State Hospital, roughly 10 miles west of Reading.”Reading Eagle: State corrections secretary celebrates success at Wernersville center“Mentally ill Americans are disproportionately more likely to be arrested, incarcerated and commit another crime once released. This problem extends to the state level. Pennsylvania Department of Corrections Secretary John Wetzel said about 27 percent of all inmates in the system have a mental illness and about 9 percent of those are battling severe disorders. So to address the needs of this unique population the department launched a new program solely dedicated to helping those offenders return to the community after they have served their time.”Follow the Department of Corrections on Twitter @CorrectionsPA and on Facebook. Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more


first_img“No, we lost,” he said. “It still goes in the loss column. We learned a few things. We know we can get a lot better.”Then again, sixth-man Jamal Crawford could not deny there was some good that came out of the team’s first setback of the season.“The fact that we fought back is encouraging,” said Crawford, whose team plays host to Houston on Saturday night at Staples Center. “To get down 17 in this environment against the champs and still have resolve and still have the lead in the fourth quarter shows a lot of character on this team.” Even Jordan had to go along with that.“Yeah, I think we can compete with not just them, but anyone,” he said. “Like I said before, they are a great team with a lot of great guys who have been together for a while and so have we. They have probably one of the best crowds in the league and I’m proud of the way we came in. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Considering they were down by 17 points in the second quarter to the defending champion Golden State Warriors on Wednesday at Oracle Arena in Oakland, where just two nights earlier the Warriors demolished Memphis by 50 points, one would think the L.A. Clippers might look at their eventual 112-108 loss as a moral victory of sorts.Not necessarily.“It would have been encouraging if we won,” shooting guard J.J. Redick said. “We are not the ‘Bad News Bears.’ We are a team that has championship aspirations and for us to do that, we have to win.”Center DeAndre Jordan was asked if he was encouraged by the showing by the Clipper (4-1). He shot that down.center_img “We have a lot of work to do, but we will be all right.”The Clippers went up by 10 points at 97-87 on a basket by Crawford with 7:56 to play. The Warriors (5-0) outscored them 25-11 down the stretch.The rivalryGolden State’s Klay Thompson scored 16 points on 7-of-18 shooting Wednesday. Afterward, he talked about this budding rivalry and how he expects their games to be hotly contested.“It’s going to be like that every time we play these guys,” Thompson said. “There are a lot of improved guys on their team, so it was good. Whoever it is, who’s out there, we don’t like to lose on our home court, so it would have been a tough loss.”Paul injuredPoint guard Chris Paul left Wednesday’s game with 13.3 seconds left because of a groin issue.“I don’t know, I’ll find out,” coach Doc Rivers said, when asked to assess the extent of the injury. “I don’t think it’s severe.”Scouting the RocketsSaturday will be the first time the Clippers see the Rockets since Houston beat the Clippers in seven games in the Western Conference semifinals. Houston’s Game 7 victory in Houston came after the Clippers blew Game 6 at Staples Center.The Rockets started 0-3 this season but have since beat Oklahoma City and Orlando. Houston, which plays Friday at Sacramento, is being led in scoring by James Harden. He’s averaging 23.8 points, but he’s shooting just 29.4 percent — 16.4 percent from 3-point range.Harden has shot 55 3-pointers, making only nine.last_img read more