first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg Businessweek:As President Donald Trump prepares to pay failing coal plants to stay open, several states are hatching plans to gently put them to sleep. One solution gaining steam among lawmakers, environmentalists, and policy experts can be found in an unlikely place: the bond market.For utilities, getting out of the coal business can be costly. They have to pay to dismantle generators, and they don’t want to miss out on future revenue by scrapping still-productive assets early. Plus, coal-plant workers will need to be retrained for other jobs. To pay for all that, states could allow utilities to issue special bonds at low rates. While the plan has yet to be implemented, Colorado, New Mexico, and Missouri are among the states where legislation has been debated.“If there’s a no-cost option available to the state, I think it would be absurd to not do it,” says Jacob Candelaria, a Democratic state senator in New Mexico. Candelaria sponsored a bill that failed to pass and plans to reintroduce it next year. No tax dollars would be spent for such bonds, he says, but the debt would be backed by ratepayers. That means the utility can add a special charge to customers’ bills to cover the payments. The predictable cash flow means the bonds can carry lower rates. For years, coal’s been losing out to cheaper natural gas and cleaner renewables such as wind and solar. Coal-fired facilities accounted for more than half of U.S. electricity from 1949 through 2005, according to the Energy Information Administration. Since then, its share has declined to less than one-third of the U.S. total.Strategies for managing the transition vary. The operators of New England’s power grid have instituted a plan, sometimes called “cash for clunkers,” that includes—as a side effect to making room for new clean energy sources—paying old plants to retire. Trump, who has struggled to fulfill a campaign promise to help the coal industry, announced on June 1 that he was ordering Energy Secretary Rick Perry to stem the tide of closures. The government would establish a “strategic electric generation reserve” and compel grid operators to buy electricity from coal and nuclear plants. The administration says this is to protect national security. Still, many state and local authorities—and even a lot of utilities—see coal-plant shuttering as inevitable. Almost two dozen coal plants, with a combined capacity of more than 16 gigawatts, are scheduled to close in 2018, according to data compiled by Bloomberg New Energy Finance from the EIA and the Sierra Club. Another 30 gigawatts’ worth of plants are slated to follow suit by the end of 2025.It’s just a question of how the process unwinds. Candelaria estimates his legislation would have allowed utility PNM Resources Inc. to issue bonds that would pay 1 percent to 3 percent, as long as the proceeds were spent on shutting a coal plant. If PNM had to issue bonds on its own to do the same thing, it might have to pay interest of 6 percent to 8 percent, the lawmaker says. The exact rates would depend on a variety of factors, but “we’re talking about real money,” Candelaria says. Ron Darnell, senior vice president of public policy for PNM, calls the strategy “an equitable way to facilitate the transition to newer, cleaner energy resources.”More: Buy Bonds, Kill Coal States turn to bond market to fund decommissioning of coal plantslast_img read more


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first_img A birdie-three on the 17th hole provided the key to Mark Willis winning the Fullers London Pride Gold Medal in the closest finish in the history of the 17-year history of the popular event for club golfers. It help the 34 year old from the Kendleshire club in Bristol to return 34 Stableford points over the Hotchkin course at Woodhall Spa for an aggregate of 70. That left him tied with playing partner Aiden Tanner from Norwich, who also signed for 34. So a card countback was needed to decide the winner. Both scored 15 points on the back nine, both recorded ten over the back six, but Willis’ birdie at 17 helped give him eight points over the back three compared to Tanner’s seven. It couldn’t have been closer and Willis even managed to get up-and-down from behind a bunker then sink a 15-foot putt on the last hole to save par or the first prize would have slipped away. “That was the longest putt I’d holed all day,” said Willis. “But I’m very surprised but proud to have won. I’m surprised because my game has not been good coming into the event so I didn’t think I’d be in the hunt. “But I think the course and the wind helped me as it made conditions difficult for everyone else. My putter was cold all weekend but it came good when I needed it.” Compared to the first day, conditions improved with a lot of sunshine but the wind gradually increased to be quite strong towards the end, a factor reflected in the scoring. Tanner, the 16 year old from the Costessey Park club, was naturally disappointed but he was disappointed by his form over the back nine. “I messed up on the back nine but Mark played well and deserved to win.” Third place was also decided on countback, Rob Sims from Bulbury Woods in Dorset edging out overnight leader Justin Brassell after both finished with 69 points. Sims, 60 year old warehouseman from Corfe Mullen, recorded 36 points in his second round to Brassell’s 32 and said: “The putts went in today. But I also drove the ball well and my plan was to play for position and I only found two bunkers.” The nine-handicapper had four birdies on his card but was annoyed to not score on the final hole. 18 Aug 2013 Crucial birdie tips the balance in Willis’s favour last_img read more


first_imgPolice have arrested Gabriel James Gamez, 22, of San Antonio, Texas, as the gunman. A stranger to the two victims, it was reported that he got into an altercation with the two teenagers and drew his gun and fired shots that connected with Turner’s back and Woodson’s leg.Both youths were rushed to the Duke University Medical Center for treatment, where just moments after arriving, Turner was pronounced dead. Woodson, however, survived and is expected to make a full physical recovery.“Today is a sad day,” said Gateway spokesperson Cara Ann Zannella. “We were very upset when we received the news on Thursday evening the two had been shot. Both had been outstanding kids and athletes. Darrell will be terribly missed.”Zanella said counseling was available to students who wanted to talk about Mr. Turner’s death until Monday but that there wouldn’t be any more counseling unless district officials see a need.The athletes were in Durham visiting Duke University as a part of the Team Swag football tour, organized by a man by the name of Ayo Fapohonda.“The tour was organized to promote the skills of high school football players throughout the (Commonwealth) of Pennsylvania,” Gateway Athletics facility site manager Kevin Stevens said, who made the trip to Durham with the players.Stevens mentioned that there were 18 student athletes and five adults, from all over the area, present with the Team Swag tour.“The tour is designed to help kids in Pa. receive enhanced college recruiting,” Stevens said. “It is responsible for getting the kids to compete in 7-on-7 games, all over, and for them to gain exposure from coaches, who come to these events to evaluate high schoolers.”Fapohonda, who facilitates all of the tour’s events, is also known for his creation of the finestpreps.com website that helps promote the talents of the athletes that take part in his program. He was unreachable for comment.The particular leg of the tour that reached Durham was intended to target the Southern U.S. and some of its collegiate athletic programs.“We’d visited (the University of Virginia) first, and then we got to Durham to visit Duke. We were going to head to Jacksonville after visiting Duke and another school in North Carolina and intended to visit the IMG academy in Bradenton (Florida) to compete. We were then going to hit Atlanta, also for competition. We hoped to get a lot done for the student athletes.”The shooting happened in a local shopping center in Durham near the team’s hotel. The group had just finished their meal at a Five Guys Restaurant nearby.“Darrell was the closet person to the assailant,” Stevens said. “Tom was the furthest from the shooting and when he realized what was happening he began to run away. Unfortunately, he was still shot. It was senseless. If you’re an adult and carrying (a) weapon, there’s no way that they should just start shooting at kids. It’s just unacceptable.”“He was just at my son’s graduation party,” Tammy Richardson, the mother of Gateway’s star former wide receiver, Christian Richardson said. “Darrell was very close to my daughter, he was like her big brother. I fed him for four years. I only have one son, but as an involved parent, something like this feels like I’ve lost one of my own.”Gateway’s head football coach and athletic director Terry Smith, deeply saddened, has declined to submit comments to the media.“I was at the vigil that was held for Darrell after everyone had received the news,” Richardson said. “It was terrible to see how many young people had been affected by this. But it wasn’t only them. It felt as though the whole community had experienced a loss.”Visitation is set for Thursday from 2-8 p.m. at Mt. Ararat Baptist Church, 271 Paulson Ave. in East Liberty. Funeral services will be held on Friday at 11 a.m. in the Potter’s House Ministry Church, 430 Cathedral Ave., in Mt. Oliver.(Malik Vincent can be reached can be reached at malikvincent@gmail.com.) DARRELL TURNER JR. and THOMAS WOODSON by Malik VincentAt around 10 p.m. on the evening of June 25, it was reported that two varsity football players at Gateway High School were shot, one fatally, after eating at a local establishment in Durham, N.C.The shooting claimed the life of Darrell Turner Jr., 18, a senior linebacker for the Gators and wounded Thomas Woodson, a junior, and the team’s starting quarterback.last_img read more