first_imgTupelo Music Hall in White River Junction is partnering with the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce to help the many area victims of Tropical Storm Irene. The music venue is presenting a full weekend of music, ‘A Weekend of Giving,’ to benefit the Chamber’s efforts to raise funds to be turned over to The Upper Valley Haven to get food, clothing, building materials, and whatever storm victims may need directly into their hands.Tupelo will kick off the weekend with a great night of music and dancing with the Gully Boys on Thursday, September 8 at 8 pm. Tickets for the General Admission show are $10, with all proceeds going to the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce’s fund for residents of Hartford who were affected by Hurricane Irene. To purchase tickets, call 802-698-8341 or visit www.TupeloHallVermont.com(link is external). The show is presented with the support of Yellow House Media.The popular Upper Valley band will play the first hour “unplugged” and finish up with a classic set of Grateful Dead and originals. The band’s line-up includes band leader Bill Temple on vocals, Rich Meijer and Al Romero on guitar, Dave Clark on bass, and Jimmy Brewer on drums. Tupelo continues their ‘Weekend of Giving’ by donating $5.00 of every ticket sold from their upcoming shows: Leo Kottke 9/9, Renaissance 9/10, and Ellis Paul 9/11 to local families in need of assistance from the devastation of Hurricane Irene. ‘Tupelo is grateful for the warm welcome we’ve received in the community in our first year, and since we are a part of the community, it’s only natural to help when our neighbors are in need,’ said Scott Hayward, owner of Tupelo Music Hall.  ‘I’m thrilled that Tupelo wanted to work with the Chamber to help coordinate this wonderful event to benefit our community. We are stronger when working together,’ said Mollie Martin, Executive Director of the Hartford Area Chamber of Commerce.  For more information about this event and HACC’s Hurricane Irene Relief Fund, please call 802-295-7900.last_img read more


first_imgThe relentless pace of regulatory change is the new normal.by: Bill KlewinI’ve been writing about lending, operations, and regulatory compliance for Credit Union Magazine for almost 20 years. This is my last column. I am retiring.Over the last 20 years, you’ve learned a little about my family, my views—and hopefully a few things you’ve been able to use in serving your members.I will miss your comments, your camaraderie, and your passion about what we do. I will miss being told I am contributing to the downfall of Western civilization (I am all-powerful, apparently), and I will miss the feeling of satisfaction when I have helped someone at a credit union solve a particularly troublesome problem.With that said, I have one last chance to bring out my crystal ball and look ahead to the regulatory challenges you will face in lending in 2015 and beyond. There is really only one theme: the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has only begun to affect your business.Here are just a few of the issues you will face: continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more


first_imgA recent survey showed that credit unions and their members are looking for different things from their credit cards. In fact, 76% credit union card goals were aimed toward growth, while the rest prioritized member services. But here’s the rub: 100% of members polled listed “false declines” as their number one service issue for credit cards. Clearly, there’s a disconnect between member experience and credit union card goals. Growth is a good end goal but making sure existing cardholders feel taken care of is paramount for retention.  There is nothing more frustrating to a member than a false decline in the middle of a busy day. Why Card Declines are a Problem Speaking from personal experience, I know how frustrating a false decline is. Recently, an old friend came through town. We caught up over drinks and because we were on my home turf, I offered to pick up the tab. My card was declined. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more


first_imgPathway from crisis Although hotspots like New York face a dire lack of protective gear, ventilators and medics, there was further cause for optimism, with early-hit states like Washington and California demonstrating a possible pathway out of the crisis.Washington appears to be on the downward slope of its case curve and has even sent 400 ventilators to New York, but its governor Jay Inslee said he feared a second wave because of the ongoing patchwork response.”Even if Washington gets on top of this fully, if another state doesn’t, it can come back and come across our borders two months from now, so this is important to have a national success,” he told NBC. California is also showing how it is possible to get on top of the crisis, said epidemiologist Brandon Brown of the University of California, Riverside.  “We are now ramping up testing, starting to measure community spread, preparing spaces for when hospitals may be overrun,” he said. On the sports front, the golf world has reconfigured its schedule — the Masters will now be in November, and the US Open and Ryder Cup will go ahead on back-to-back weeks in September.”Sports, and particularly the game of golf, are important vehicles for healing and hope,” said PGA of America chief executive Seth Waugh. Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins University, which has been keeping a running tally of coronavirus numbers, said at least 356,942 US cases had been confirmed, with 10,524 deaths.Only Italy (15,877) and Spain (13,055) have seen more of their citizens killed by the deadly pandemic. There was a glimmer of hope however in New York, the main focus of the US outbreak, where there have been more than 4,750 deaths statewide and 130,000 cases. Governor Andrew Cuomo said Monday the death rate had been “effectively flat” for two days. The state reported 599 new deaths, similar to Sunday’s tally of 594 and down from a record 630 on Saturday. But the governor ordered schools and non-essential businesses to remain shut for a further three weeks, telling reporters: “Now is not the time to be lax.”  Topics :center_img ‘Social distancing is working’ “It is hopeful but it is also inconclusive,” Cuomo said, adding that it would be a “mistake” to relax restrictions too early.”If the curve is turning, it’s because the rate of infection is going down. If the rate of infection is going down, it’s because social distancing is working.” The pandemic has killed nearly 75,000 worldwide since the emergence of the new coronavirus in December in China, according to an AFP tally compiled from official sources. Authorities have warned that between 100,000 and 240,000 people could die in the United States, even in a best-case scenario with social distancing guidelines being observed. Nine states — all controlled by Republican governors — have still not yet ordered total lockdowns, much to the frustration of public health experts.Wisconsin, which is among those under stay-at-home orders, became the 15th state to delay presidential primaries after initially determining to forge ahead.Governor Tony Evers, citing the risk to poll workers and voters, ordered that Tuesday’s Democratic presidential primary and local elections in the Midwestern US state be postponed until June.”I cannot in good conscience stand by and do nothing,” said Evers, whose health officials have registered 2,267 positive tests and 68 deaths.Evers moved to delay the election unilaterally after the Republican-majority state Senate and state Assembly ignored his repeated appeals for a postponement. Americans were put on notice Monday not to let up in the fight against the coronavirus, as a grim milestone of 10,000 deaths cast a pall over the first signs of optimism about the trajectory of the outbreak.The United States has emerged as one of the world’s worst-hit nations, with a steadily mounting number of fatalities and millions facing the possibility of economic ruin.Authorities began the week by telling frightened communities to brace for one of the worst periods yet in the crisis as the outbreak has not yet reached its peak.last_img read more


first_imgThree of the members have Brier experience.So does two of the first two rinks the Shypitka team plays against to open the eight-team spiel  — Craig Lepine of Langley and Mel Steffin of New Westminster.“We feel confident, we have a lot of experience on the team,” Thomson explained. “We can play an aggressive game and if we get up a little bit we have the skills to hopefully keep things pretty clean.”Day two Team Shypitka meets the other Kootenay rep in the tournament, Castlegar’s Myron Nichol.Joining Nichol is third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz. The Sunflower City rink opens Tuesday against Wes Craig of Victoria and Rick Pughe of New Westminster.Each team plays two games each day with the top three teams advancing to Saturday’s playoff round. Friday is set aside for tie-breakers.The top teams automatically gains a spot in Saturday’s final while the second and third squads battle to advance into the championship.“Playoffs would be ideal, finishing first would be even better,” Thomson explained.“You might get away with three losses to get into a playoff but four losses and your probably done. If you can go through with one or two losses I think you’ll have a pretty shot at finishing first.”EXTRA END: The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks is the lone rep for the Kootenays in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Championships held at the same time as the men’s in Trail. Hiram is joined by third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead Cindy Pettapiece. Fred Thomson would like to think all his years of competing in the Trail Curling Club would give his team the edge heading into play Tuesday at the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Men’s Championships.That may be the case, say, at the junior level.This is the Senior Men’s Division where skips, thirds, seconds and leads have seen more ice than an Eskimo.“It’s not going to be easy at all,” said Thomson, playing third for the Kootenay’s top seed, the Tom Shypitka rink of Cranbrook.“I understand (Trail committee) has brought in a different icemaker so he’s probably going to change up the ice somewhat.”“Plus (our rink) doesn’t see a lot of each other during the year . . . we don’t practice we don’t throw rocks together so I don’t think there will be a whole lot of home ice advantage for us.”Thomson, is joined by skip Tom Shypitka of Cranbrook, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale.last_img read more


first_imgFrom an elite event of standard distance the Wasa Triathlon, in the Kootenays of B.C., has transformed into one of the most family friendly festival weekends in Western Canada. The event has grown over the last 20 years from 90 competitors to over 1000 participants with nearly one quarter being young triathletes aged between four to 15 years old. Race director, Charlie Cooper says “the event attracts families from all over B.C., Alberta and North West USA.”  “The growth in recent years has been led by the number of young triathletes coming with their families.  We are proud to cater for all ages with the first event day being dedicated to support our younger competitors.”On Saturday June 11, the Trikids Triathlon will again see a large group of smiley kids crossing the finish line for a well-earned medal.  Cooper explains that all young competitors will get to enjoy the same race experience as the adults: professional announcer Steve King, loads of volunteer support, drink stations, electronic timing, the exciting finish chute lined up with spectators, a catered lunch and a groovy t-shirt. “We want these young triathletes to love the sport, experience the competition but above all it’s about participation and having a fun weekend with the family,” Cooper said.”Many Albertan families use the Wasa triathlon as a camping weekend, enjoying the long summer mountain days and impressive setting.” For mums and dads there is some serious racing to be had on the Sunday with the sprint and standard distances both for individual and relay teams.The scenic shores of Wasa Lake attract amateurs and elite triathletes to compete in this swim-bike-run event. First-timers in the sport also target this event as a must-do to kick off their season. It’s not only the picturesque mountain scenery and pure air that attracts competitors says Cooper, the prize money is good too, with $4,300 to be awarded to the top five finishers in the women and men categories. The quality of the competition every year makes Wasa’s standard course one of the most competitive and fastest. All TriKids receive some good orienteering and preparation to make it a fun, memorable and safe experience. Many parents report young ones sleeping with their medals and proudly wearing their Wasa event shirt to school! Registration at www.rmevents.com closes June 9 for Adults & TriKids.last_img read more


first_imgAfter winning the Kentucky Derby for the second straight year, jockey Victor Espinoza is excited to go for the elusive Triple Crown. Follow Victor as he visits ESPN and throws out the first pitch at Dodger Stadium. Good luck in the Preakness Stakes on Saturday, May 16! Come to Santa Anita for live racing plus watch the simulcast of the Preakness Stakes. Special packages available.last_img