first_imgThree of the members have Brier experience.So does two of the first two rinks the Shypitka team plays against to open the eight-team spiel  — Craig Lepine of Langley and Mel Steffin of New Westminster.“We feel confident, we have a lot of experience on the team,” Thomson explained. “We can play an aggressive game and if we get up a little bit we have the skills to hopefully keep things pretty clean.”Day two Team Shypitka meets the other Kootenay rep in the tournament, Castlegar’s Myron Nichol.Joining Nichol is third Rick Brown, second Terry Kryzcka and lead Rob Babiarz. The Sunflower City rink opens Tuesday against Wes Craig of Victoria and Rick Pughe of New Westminster.Each team plays two games each day with the top three teams advancing to Saturday’s playoff round. Friday is set aside for tie-breakers.The top teams automatically gains a spot in Saturday’s final while the second and third squads battle to advance into the championship.“Playoffs would be ideal, finishing first would be even better,” Thomson explained.“You might get away with three losses to get into a playoff but four losses and your probably done. If you can go through with one or two losses I think you’ll have a pretty shot at finishing first.”EXTRA END: The Teresa Hiram rink of Grand Forks is the lone rep for the Kootenays in the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Women’s Championships held at the same time as the men’s in Trail. Hiram is joined by third Rhonda Lee Bedard, second Rose Beauchamp and lead Cindy Pettapiece. Fred Thomson would like to think all his years of competing in the Trail Curling Club would give his team the edge heading into play Tuesday at the Tim Horton’s B.C. Senior Men’s Championships.That may be the case, say, at the junior level.This is the Senior Men’s Division where skips, thirds, seconds and leads have seen more ice than an Eskimo.“It’s not going to be easy at all,” said Thomson, playing third for the Kootenay’s top seed, the Tom Shypitka rink of Cranbrook.“I understand (Trail committee) has brought in a different icemaker so he’s probably going to change up the ice somewhat.”“Plus (our rink) doesn’t see a lot of each other during the year . . . we don’t practice we don’t throw rocks together so I don’t think there will be a whole lot of home ice advantage for us.”Thomson, is joined by skip Tom Shypitka of Cranbrook, second Don Freschi of Trail and Bill King of Fruitvale.last_img read more


first_imgFrom an elite event of standard distance the Wasa Triathlon, in the Kootenays of B.C., has transformed into one of the most family friendly festival weekends in Western Canada. The event has grown over the last 20 years from 90 competitors to over 1000 participants with nearly one quarter being young triathletes aged between four to 15 years old. Race director, Charlie Cooper says “the event attracts families from all over B.C., Alberta and North West USA.”  “The growth in recent years has been led by the number of young triathletes coming with their families.  We are proud to cater for all ages with the first event day being dedicated to support our younger competitors.”On Saturday June 11, the Trikids Triathlon will again see a large group of smiley kids crossing the finish line for a well-earned medal.  Cooper explains that all young competitors will get to enjoy the same race experience as the adults: professional announcer Steve King, loads of volunteer support, drink stations, electronic timing, the exciting finish chute lined up with spectators, a catered lunch and a groovy t-shirt. “We want these young triathletes to love the sport, experience the competition but above all it’s about participation and having a fun weekend with the family,” Cooper said.”Many Albertan families use the Wasa triathlon as a camping weekend, enjoying the long summer mountain days and impressive setting.” For mums and dads there is some serious racing to be had on the Sunday with the sprint and standard distances both for individual and relay teams.The scenic shores of Wasa Lake attract amateurs and elite triathletes to compete in this swim-bike-run event. First-timers in the sport also target this event as a must-do to kick off their season. It’s not only the picturesque mountain scenery and pure air that attracts competitors says Cooper, the prize money is good too, with $4,300 to be awarded to the top five finishers in the women and men categories. The quality of the competition every year makes Wasa’s standard course one of the most competitive and fastest. All TriKids receive some good orienteering and preparation to make it a fun, memorable and safe experience. Many parents report young ones sleeping with their medals and proudly wearing their Wasa event shirt to school! Registration at www.rmevents.com closes June 9 for Adults & TriKids.last_img read more


first_imgAfter winning the Kentucky Derby for the second straight year, jockey Victor Espinoza is excited to go for the elusive Triple Crown. Follow Victor as he visits ESPN and throws out the first pitch at Dodger Stadium. Good luck in the Preakness Stakes on Saturday, May 16! Come to Santa Anita for live racing plus watch the simulcast of the Preakness Stakes. Special packages available.last_img