first_imgHere’s how to write an award-winning movie: pick a random Middle Eastern country with oil… insert conflict that can threaten the oil supply… enter the United States with guns blazing and people dying. Sounds pretty unoriginal, but it’s the plot of the 2005 movie Syriana, which won an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay (go figure). But what’s even more frightening than the limited imagination of Hollywood’s Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is that the US government has followed this plot line to a T so many times. And it’s not any different this time around. The United States will invade Syria or even Iran, secure the oil supply, and occupy the country for decades to come. Politicians will become richer, innocent people will die, and thinking Americans will have yet another reason to doubt their government. America’s involvement this war around probably won’t be as controversial, because many Western countries have already stated their support for the Syrian rebels. Russia’s support for the Syrian government will definitely stir things up, but we don’t think that will be too big of an issue. In fact, the US has already been training non-Islamist rebels in Jordan and has approved providing lethal arms to this group. Next, watch for the pro-war rhetoric to flare up. It’s almost that time again, when the White House and Congress will say and do anything to get the public riled up enough to happily march to the frontlines or, at the very least, “support our troops kids who are being sent to the desert as cannon fodder.” US Secretary of State John Kerry has accused the Syrian government of destroying evidence in an area believed to be the site of a chemical weapon attack, and (gasp!) Syria has been refusing to allow the UN to investigate the alleged attack sites. All of this sounds just a little bit too familiar for our taste. We all know how much of a problem the Iraq debacle has been for the US government and its budget. In fact, we may just be weeks away from seeing Tomahawk cruise missiles raining on Damascus. As Doug Casey likes to put it, never let a good crisis go to waste. Though Syria is not a major producer of oil, the impact of its civil war can reach far beyond its borders to countries such as Iran, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia. We believe this saber-rattling by the US government is simply another step toward trying to secure the Persian Gulf… and its precious oil resources. Every time the US government does this, oil has the potential to skyrocket—which, while being bad news for most people, is fantastic news for those who are already invested in the sector because it lifts all oil plays, whether in the desert or elsewhere. Right now, we’re monitoring a promising investment that could massively profit from the next Middle Eastern oil crisis. This company’s plans are so secretive that the company’s lawyers would not even allow us a site tour to find out about its next—and quite possibly crucial—drill results. However, as soon as the company breaks its silence, Casey Energy Report subscribers will hear about it immediately, for a chance to jump into what may be the energy opportunity of a lifetime. The critical drill results are only weeks away. If you give the Casey Energy Report a risk-free try today, you’ll be among the select few who will not just survive these turbulent markets, but who could multiply your net assets with just one investment. Click here to find out more. Additional Links and Reads Gas-Rich Tanzania to Start Power Exports in 2015 (Gulf Times) Due to BG and Statoil’s success in offshore Tanzania, the once energy-starved African nation is set to become an exporter by 2015. Unfortunately for the United States, 2015 is also around the time other countries begin ramping up their liquefied natural-gas (LNG) exports, namely Australia, which is poised to become the Qatar of the Asian-Pacific and own about 20% of the market by 2020. With all these developments, can LNG really be the real savior of the US gas market? Sierra Leone Man Busted by Undercover US Agents for Attempted Uranium Sale to Iran (Jerusalem Post) At least someone was set to make money in the uranium markets. Just how much is 1,000 tons of uranium? Even at current, depressed market prices, the man was set to pocket a cool $70 million for his company. It appears he has brokered deals with other countries in the past. It will be interesting to see where this goes. China National Petroleum Corp. Executive Is Investigated (Wall Street Journal) We recently published a report on national oil companies (NOCs) vs. international oil companies (IOCs). In it, we highlighted many reasons why NOCs sometimes trade at a discount to IOCs. One reason why is highlighted in this article: officials abusing their powers and taking advantage of the lack of transparency in reporting. It really is no surprise; but there are still opportunities when it comes to NOCs. Click here for more information.last_img

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