first_imgThe Lifetime ISA announced in Wednesday’s UK Budget introduces a rival savings vehicle to the traditional pension fund. Jonathan Williams argues that the brand recognition of the Lifetime ISA risks undermining the success of auto-enrolmentFor months, the UK pensions industry has been preparing for chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne to overhaul pension taxation, switching from a system whereby savings are taxed upon drawdown (EET) to one where you get taxed when paying in (TEE).While Wednesday’s Budget did not see these changes materialise, the proposal for a Lifetime ISA potentially heralds the beginning of a much more dangerous trend – one that continues to place the onus on the individual to act, while undermining a decade-long consensus about the need for ‘inertia’ to get people saving into pensions.The success of auto-enrolment is beyond doubt. As the Pensions Regulator (TPR) and the Office for National Statistics show with the release of each new batch of data on pension saving, millions of workers are now putting aside money for retirement. The numbers show 6m new savers compared with 2012, according to TPR’s most recent report. The government has been vocally backing the reforms, first with their terrible (and terribly catchy) workplace pension rap, and more recently through a campaign that regularly sees a 2-metre tall furry purple monster called Workie smiling down from the side of a bus, or lumbering around inner-city parks, reminding people to save into an occupational pension.So most people would have assumed, based on the evidence, that the government supported auto-enrolment, and the associated pension providers, as the best means as saving for retirement. So why does the chancellor seem intent on questioning their role, and, in effect, stabbing Workie in the back?The end of the Turner consensusThe answer is an ideological one. The political consensus carefully built from 2004 onwards by the Turner Commission, which recommended auto-enrolment as a way of forcing the hand of uninformed consumers, has been crumbling since its 10th anniversary.The 2014 Budget saw the revolutionary pension freedoms introduced, supposedly without the prior knowledge of the then-pensions minister Steve Webb, whose own proposals for collective DC akin to the Dutch system were crippled by a member’s ability to draw down pensions savings from 55 onwards.The ability to draw down money as members wished, without needing to buy an annuity, placed the emphasis on an informed and educated individual to act, and to navigate the complex world of finance associated with it by finding a drawdown product. As David Blake, an academic at the Pensions Institute recently noted, the changes effectively saw members brought into an institutional system through inertia, only to be thrown back into the retail market when they had to make decisions that would impact their finances for the rest of their lives.This focus on the individual operating within the retail market is set to continue with the introduction of the Lifetime ISA. While the ISA product and auto-enrolment both survive what Keith Ambachtsheer, the Canadian pension academic, calls the ‘Elevator Test’, once it comes to the drawdown phase, it is less likely you can explain to a pension saver during the trip to the 6th floor how to access a drawdown product. With an ISA, you simply take the money.The ISA also has the advantage of brand recognition and, in the Lifetime ISA, the selling point that you can use the savings – and the 25% top-up – to finance your first home. Pension savings, in the meantime, remain locked away for the future. Which product would, therefore, be more attractive to a cash-strapped saver under 40, even if by using an ISA she misses out on the 3% employers pay in as part of auto-enrolment?The answer may seem obvious to someone who understands the benefit of getting ‘free money’ from the employer, but the lure of the 25% bonus might win over many who do not understand that the minimum 3% contribution under auto-enrolment is actually a better deal than the ISA top-up, and that you get more by contributing less.NEST unboundThe real question, in this new world with a focus on individuals, is whether Osborne will see reforms through to their logical end and allow savers to dictate into which provider an employer has to place contributions. The approach, already in place in Australia to some extent, might trigger an advertising war between providers, but it would also unleash the free market on providers failing to offer value for money, or those investing in a way that’s not aligned with members.If the Conservative government really wants to put the onus on the individual, it must give savers full control and let choice drive consolidation, either towards the National Employment Savings Trusts, Now: Pensions and People’s Pensions in the market, or the insurer-backed master trusts.Such competition would require strong, sustainable and well-governed pension providers. Further, in an industry that has well-run not-for-profit trusts schemes, it would boost funds investing with the sole aim of the best outcome for members, not the dual goal of profits and returns.Jonathan Williams is deputy news editor at IPElast_img read more


first_imgMurray d’Almeida. There’s plenty of space to entertain on the deck. One of the best spots in the house during winter. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:44Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p288p288p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow to bid at auction for your dream home? 01:45 Now that’s a pool.AS a busy businessman, Murray d’Almeida needs a quiet place to sit back and relax in his spare time.His acreage estate in a secluded pocket of Currumbin Valley has been the perfect escape.For about 30 years the founder of Retail Food Group Australia and veteran Gold Coast businessman has called the 1.02ha property his slice of paradise.He and wife Cath have raised four children in the seven-bedroom, three-bathroom rainforest retreat, which he described as tranquil. What a view.Parts of the picturesque property were used in scenes for a 2013 film, My Mistress, starring international French actress Emmanuelle Beart.“It was fascinating,” Mr d’Almeida said.“(Emmanuelle) was a delightful person.”While Mr d’Almeida loves the property just as much as he did when he bought it, he has decided to sell it.“I will miss it beyond comprehension, however seven bedrooms and a five-car garage … are far too much,” he said.“I will try to find something similar but a fraction of the size.“I’d like to get a couple of acres further up the valley — the valley is god’s country.”McGrath Palm Beach agent Richard Snowden will take the property to auction on February 16.center_img MORE NEWS: What it’s like to live a life of luxury in the modern world It’s like taking a holiday in a rainforest retreat. Even the kitchen has views.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa12 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“The house just about blends in naturally with the rainforest environment with very large decks that merge into the canopy,” he said.It is surrounded by trees with 200m of creek frontage, making it feel as though it is a world away from civilisation.MORE NEWS: Auction racks up $12 million in sales Mr d’Almeida said one of the best parts about it was that it was private yet the beach was a 10-minute drive away.“We have the best of both worlds,” he said.Among its standout features are a media room, two fireplaces, a wine cellar, multiple decks around the house and an infinity edge pool overlooking the creek.last_img read more


first_img Tweet Share Share Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Photo credit: unl.edu1Free HIV testing are being conducted in all health districts today as part of activities leading up to Regional Testing Day which will be held on the 27th of June. This is a result of a partnership between the Caribbean Broadcast Media Partnership on HIV and AIDS and Scotia bank.Expanded from its pilot programme in 2008, which was concentrated in Barbados, the initiative aims, this year, to have approximately 10,000 people across the region tested.Coordinator of the Testing and Counseling program within the HIV Unit Mary Williams says one of the main reasons for this testing campaign is to encourage everyone to know his/her status, since knowing ones’ HIV status is better than not knowing. She says the gesture will also be extended to the Kalinago Territory over the weekend.Dominica Vibes News HealthLifestyleLocalNews Free HIV testing ahead of Regional Testing Day next week by: – June 24, 2011 16 Views   no discussionslast_img read more


first_imgTheft cases were down by 80 percent (from15 to three cases). The number of robbery cases, on theother hand, stayed the same at three. She also gave credit to the continuingpolice campaign against crimes. PRO-6 data showed 130 crimes from March16 to 19 this year, down by 215 incidents from the 345 cases recorded in thesame days in 2019. Cases of physical injury went down by66.66 percent – from 15 last year to five this year. The drop was determined by comparing thenumber of crimes recorded in such period this year and last year. “But the police won’t be complacent.There are opportunistic criminals. We are this urging people to remain in theirhouses and always keep their doors locked,” said Malong./PN Homicide cases posted a 50-percentplunge – from two last year to one this year. Murder cases dropped by 100 percent(from six incidents in 2019 to none this year).center_img “The COVID-19 concern is a factor. Localgovernment units have been urging people to stay at home. Businessestablishments have opted to close shop. Even petty crimes dropped,” saidPolice Lieutenant Colonel Joem Malong, PRO-6 spokesperson. ILOILO City – The coronavirus disease2019 (COVID-19) is believed to be a factor in the dramatic drop in crime rateacross Western Visayas – 62.31 percent in a four-day period (March 16-19),according to the Police Regional Office 6 (PRO-6). Rape cases declined, too – 71.42 percent(from seven last year to two this year). ‘GHOST TOWN’. The usually congested Sen. Benigno Aquino Jr. Avenue in the bustling district of Mandurriao, Iloilo City is empty on the first day (March 20, 2020) of the nearly month-long lockdown imposed by the city government in a bid to keep the metro free from the coronavirus disease 2019. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN The PRO-6 expects a further drop incrimes most especially in Iloilo City due to the lockdown of the metro orderedby Mayor Jerry Treñas. No carnapping incidents last year andthis year from March 16 to 19. There were two “motornapping” incidents lastyear; none this year. The eight “focus crimes” – murder,homicide, physical injury, rape, robbery, theft, carnapping, and “motornapping”– also dropped, PRO-6 data showed. It recorded 14 cases from March 16 to 19this year, way below the 50 cases it recorded in the same period in 2019. last_img read more


first_imgARSENAL Press Association PETR CECH: Recalled to the starting XI following David Ospina’s Champions League blunder, the former Chelsea man produced a stunning block at point-blank range to deny Anthony Martial in the first half and remained alert when tested in the latter stages. 8 (out of 10) HECTOR BELLERIN: Spanish full-back pressed forwards well, offering an outlet down the right in support of Arsenal’s marauding frontline. 7 PER MERTESACKER: Little for the big German to worry about as Martial rarely had anyone to support him. Needed to be more composed as United improved in the second half. 7 GABRIEL: Brazilian centre-back produced another solid display and was a threat at set-plays in the United penalty area. 7 NACHO MONREAL: Solid showing from the left-back, who got away down the overlap, but also tracked back behind Alexis Sanchez. 7 SANTI CAZORLA: Diminutive Spaniard was quick in the transition and found plenty of willing forward runners. 7 FRANCIS COQUELIN: Arsenal’s midfield enforcer revelled in the early exchanges and broke down what little forward momentum United were able to offer. 7 AARON RAMSEY: Wales international started on the right, but covered plenty of ground. Should have scored in the first half, but otherwise a solid enough display. 7 MESUT OZIL: German playmaker was both creator and finisher during Arsenal’s devastating opening spell. At the heart of every attack, showing some great vision and close control. 8 ALEXIS SANCHEZ: Superb finishes from the Chile forward, whose deft flick opened the scoring and then a bullet strike made it 3-0 before half-time. 9 THEO WALCOTT: England striker was again given the nod in attack ahead of Olivier Giroud and stretched the United backline at every opportunity. 8 Substitutes OLIVIER GIROUD (on for Walcott, 75): France forward offered a different dimension to the Arsenal attack during the closing stages. 6 ALEX OXLADE-CHAMBERLAIN (for Ozil, 75): Energetic late cameo display from the England midfielder, who provided an outlet down the right and almost added a fourth in stoppage time. 7 KIERAN GIBBS (for Sanchez, 81): Full-back was pushed into duty on the left side of midfield following Sanchez’s injury, and held the shape well. 6 MANCHESTER UNITED DAVID DE GEA: Misread the cross for the first goal, but could do nothing to prevent Arsenal’s second and third goals. 5 MATTEO DARMIAN: Feeble attempt to tackle Sanchez resulted in Arsenal’s third. Regularly roasted by the Chilean and taken off at half-time. 3 CHRIS SMALLING: Eventually got the defence working as a half-coherent unit, but by that point the damage was done. 5 DALEY BLIND: People have questioned whether the Dutchman is capable enough at centre-back. This performance only strengthens the doubters’ argument. 4 ASHLEY YOUNG: Quite simply, he is not a left-back. Booked for a first-half lunge and too often exposed. 4 MICHAEL CARRICK: Unusually sloppy in midfield, especially in the first half. Unable to pull the strings like normal. 5 BASTIAN SCHWEINSTEIGER: Off the pace yet somehow avoided being substituted at half-time. Improved after the break, but that was not hard. 5 JUAN MATA: Grew into the match having been a mere spectator early on, trying to unlock the door to no avail. 6 MEMPHIS DEPAY: An ineffective, uninspired display from the Dutchman – one that saw him replaced at the break. 5 WAYNE ROONEY: Made a number of clumsy touches and, while he worked hard for the team, this was another underwhelming display from United’s captain. 5 ANTHONY MARTIAL: United’s biggest attacking threat and only a fine Cech save prevented him reducing the deficit as half-time approached. 6 Substitutes ANTONIO VALENCIA (for Darmian, 45): Did a far better job at right-back when it came to marshalling star man Sanchez. 5 MAROUANE FELLAINI (for Depay, 45): Physical presence in midfield made a welcome change after a terrible first half from United. 6 JAMES WILSON (for Mata, 82): An attack-minded change but too little, too late by Louis van Gaal. 5 last_img read more


first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Indian Premier League News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Sanju Samson registered his second IPL hundred. Sunrisers Hyderabad wins their first encounter of the season. Kane Williamson missed his first game of the tournament.  Rahane also played a sensational innings, registering his 27th IPL fifty. However, Rahane’s knock was ended by a great effort by Manish Pandey to fall for 70. Post this, Samson along with Stokes went berserk and hammered Hyderabad bowlers’ all-around the ground. Stokes scored 16 off 9 deliveries, eventually helping the side to put mammoth 198 runs on the board.In the chase, Sunrisers Hyderabad did what not many thought they wouldn’t be able to. Both David Warner and Jonny Bairstow hit some quick runs to start the proceedings, putting Rajasthan Royals on the back foot early in the chase innings. The 110-run opening partnership in just 9.4 overs made Rajasthan Royals’ total ‘not so competitive’.Ben Stokes provided the much-needed breakthrough, sending David Warner back to the pavilion. His counterpart, Jonny Bairstow followed Warner in just the next over which gave Rajasthan Royals some hope.However, the second wicket triggered a collapse as the Sunrisers lost three more wickets in six deliveries with the victory in sight. While Jaydev Unadkat snaffled Kane Williamson, Gopal sent back Manish Pandey and Vijay Shankar. However, it was the duo of Yusuf Pathan and Rashid Khan who kept their cool and finished the chase in the penultimate over to get Sunrisers Hyderabad off the mark in IPL 2019. New Delhi: Sanju Samson’s 102, his second in the Indian Premier League had helped the Rajasthan Royals notch up 198/2. However, David Warner had some other plans and he laid the platform with a blazing 69 off 37 balls. He was well backed-up by Jonny Bairstow and Vijay Shankar and the equation boiled down to the penultimate over when Rashid Khan’s six off Jofra Archer helped Sunrisers Hyderabad not only register a five-wicket win at Rajiv Gandhi International Stadium, Hyderabad on Friday, but it was their highest successful chase in the history of the IPL. It was a superb display of batsmanship on display from Sanju Samson, David Warner and it ended with a special helicopter shot from Rashid Khan as the chase got a bit cheeky.Ajinkya Rahane chose to bat on wicket where high scores were not too regular. But Rajasthan Royals put up a mammoth total on the board. The side lost the wicket of Jos Buttler early in the innings and it took a special partnership from Samson and Rahane to steady the ship. Samson and Rahane joined strung a wonderful partnership of 119 runs together as Samson played the aggressor. With ten fours and four sixes in his innings, the 24-year-old amassed 102 runs in just 55 balls. highlightslast_img read more


first_img Published on January 9, 2013 at 8:44 pm Contact Jacob: jmklinge@syr.edu | @Jacob_Klinger_ Facebook Twitter Google+ Deon Goggins plans to play in the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl on Jan. 19. He is listed on the Bowl’s website as a defensive tackle, nose tackle and defensive end.The Syracuse defensive tackle was a two-year starter for the Orange after transferring from Cerritos Community College. He averaged 3.8 tackles per game in his 25-game career, also featuring at defensive end.The college all-star game put on by the NFL Players Association will kickoff at 6 p.m. Eastern time at the Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif., and will be broadcast on ESPN2. Dick Vermeil will coach the National Team against Herm Edwards’s American Team. The game includes 100 players, according to the game’s website.Vermeil won a Super Bowl with the St. Louis Rams’ “Greatest Show on Turf” in 1999 and Edwards coached in the NFL from 1990-2008 with the Kansas City Chiefs, Tampa Bay Buccaneers and New York Jets.Former SU running back Antwon Bailey ran for 50 yards and a touchdown on 12 carries last year for Vermeil’s National Team before signing with the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent May 2, 2012.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more


first_imgWith just eight regular season games remaining, the Wisconsin women’s hockey team finds itself perched at No. 3 in the rankings and No. 2 in the WCHA standings, hoping to ride out the season on a hot streak.This weekend’s away series against Minnesota State comes after the Badgers’ convincing series win against defending national champions Clarkson University. Sophomore forward Sydney McKibbon said the team is now looking to win the eight games left in the season.“In-conference or out-of-conference, we want to get eight wins,” McKibbon said. “We want to move into the playoffs on a high note.”Regardless of their opponent, the Badgers are expressing confidence in their abilities, despite a recent stretch of goal-scoring troubles. However, if the team continues the form they exhibited in a 4-0 thumping of seventh-ranked Clarkson on Sunday, this should be no problem.“What we’re doing right now has been working pretty well,” sophomore forward Sarah Nurse said. “With our team, I think it’s pretty deep. Anybody can score.”Granted, freshman forward Annie Pankowski scored three of Wisconsin’s four goals on Sunday, but the principle remains that the Badgers are quite capable of tallying goals. After their last game, the team hopes the rough patch the team hit coming out of the winter break might finally be over.“On Sunday, we were finally able to put the puck in the net,” McKibbon said. “We want to continue to do that, continue to pepper the goalies. It gets frustrating when you’re getting 50 shots on net and you’re not scoring … but it makes us want to score even more and get pucks to the net.”In its last five games before the Clarkson series, Wisconsin had netted only six goals.From the Jan. 10th game vs. Minnesota through Sunday’s game vs. Clarkson, the Badgers’ offense was subpar. Through the six games, the Badgers shot, on average, 11.84 in the first period of games, 14.84 in the second and 11.5 in the third. Those shots translated into, on average, 0.17 goals in the first period, one in the second and 0.4 in the third.However, in Sunday’s game vs. Clarkson alone, the Badgers shot 14 first period shots, 15 second period shots and fell to only nine third period shots. This resulted in zero first period goals, two second period goals and two third period goals.Finding their stride again could not have come at a more convenient time, as the Badgers will face some key matchups in determining their final place for the upcoming WCHA and NCAA tournaments.  The WCHA begins in about one month.Among the teams contesting Wisconsin on their march toward the finish are Minnesota-Duluth, who will look to spoil the Badgers’ plans. The Bulldogs find themselves four points behind the Badgers in the WCHA conference standings. Two wins against Wisconsin next week would put the Bulldogs even with the Badgers.Yet the Badgers only concern themselves with the tasks at hand in preparation for this weekend’s series. Minnesota State currently sits at the bottom of the WCHA standings without a single win in conference play at 0-17-1. Regardless, the Badgers are aware that the Mavericks will look to end their campaign on a high note by taking down the third-ranked team in the nation.“I think whenever a team plays us, they get excited,” Nurse said. “So finishing out this last half of the season, we’re looking to not give any teams hope against us.”No player denies the challenges ahead, but all seem to be exhibiting the classic phrase, “cool, calm and collected,” and rightfully so. Despite recent goal troubles, the Badgers are still in excellent position to make a run at what would be head coach Mark Johnson’s fifth national title.Rebounding after their recent string of troubles has given the team the hunger and energy it needs in order to keep the momentum going. In fact, some players believe it was actually beneficial. It showed what can happen in moments of complacency and, in turn, reignited the fire that led them to a 17-2-1 record going into the winter break.“You need to stay humble,” freshman defender Maddie Rolfes said. “You need to make sure your main goals are working hard and winning instead of going out complacent and getting into bad habits.”With two series at home, Minnesota-Duluth and St. Cloud State, and two away series at Minnesota State and Ohio State, the Badgers will play in a variety of environments that will prepare them for the upcoming postseason tournaments.  The team also hopes to bring home a coveted fifth national title for Johnson, the newest member of the 350-win club.last_img read more


first_imgThe University of Wisconsin men’s golf team traveled to Cincinnati for the Bearcat Invitational to start the month of October. The lineup consisted of juniors Griffin Barela, Sam Anderson and Nick Robinson, and freshmen Coalter Smith and Sebastian Iqbal.Coldstream Country Club played host to 13 total teams, including Big Ten rival Penn State. Other major schools included Louisville, Arkansas, Cincinatti and Kentucky.After the completion of 18 holes, the Badgers sat at eight-over-par as a team, led by Anderson, Barela and Iqbal who all shot one-over-par. Robinson and Smith did not trail far behind their teammates shooting two-over and three-over-par respectively.The second loop around the course Monday put the Badgers in a tie for eighth with a combined six-over-par. Final scores after two rounds: Anderson and Iqbal two-over, Barela three-over, Smith five-over and Robinson seven-over-par.Men’s Golf: Badgers to defend home course in opening fall tournamentThe fall golf season is getting underway for the Badgers at University Ridge — their home course. In their own Read…Entering round three on Tuesday, Anderson and Iqbal were in a tie for 23rd place individually. As a team, the Badger’s sat at 11-over-par, a whopping 33 shots off the lead as Louisville dominated the field.The team ended their promising weekend with an overall score of 20-over-par, putting them in a tie for ninth out of 13 total schools. All five Badger golfers finished in the top 50 of the field.While the trio of juniors performed well, the true stars of the tournament for Wisconsin were the freshmen. Iqbal and Smith put together a strong pair of days to finish 29th and 37th overall, respectively.At the Badgers’ last tournament, the Badger Invitational, Anderson produced a ninth place finish in his debut outing. This time around, Iqbal was the best performer for Wisconsin, finishing at four-over-par. These two young golfers have proved that the future may be bright for Wisconsin golf.Look out for the Badgers Oct. 6 as they begin the Marquette Intercollegiate at the prestigious Erin Hills, home of the 2017 U.S. Open.last_img read more


first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ From the living room of their Daytona Beach apartment, Taleah Washington locked eyes with her father. He had seen this coming, and Washington sensed it too. “Writing on the wall,” James Washington said. Seven other girls filtered in and faced James, the head coach of their DME Sports Academy prep school team. It wasn’t exactly the Washington’s living room and it wasn’t exactly home, since the rest of their family was still in District Heights, Maryland. Just a temporary spot. Washington was already a Syracuse (10-11, 4-6 Atlantic Coast Conference) commit, the only DME player with a college destination selected at the start of the year. Minutes weren’t likely with the 2018-19 Orange, so James took the prep job, and the pair moved to Florida following Washington’s high school graduation. But in that three-bedroom, two-closet and one-bathroom apartment accommodating nine people, it became clear their plan was jeopardized. Soon, Washington and her teammates wouldn’t be associated with DME anymore. It was only January, the middle of their season, but an untenable economic situation led to them shutting down the program, James said. The rooms were filled with air mattresses. “Here we go again,” he thought, “another obstacle.”Because that’s exactly what it was: Yet another obstacle. Washington’s freshman year at Syracuse has introduced her to the first stable program since she finished eighth grade. Forestville Military Academy, where she spent her freshman and sophomore years in high school, closed. Rock Creek Christian Academy, where she transferred for her final two years, had five girls on its roster to start. Then, DME folded.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Here, I know I don’t have to worry about that,” Washington said.Syracuse isn’t going anywhere. The minutes head coach Quentin Hillsman gave Washington at the beginning of the season might have disappeared, but they’ll re-emerge at some point. It might be next year, when Gabrielle Cooper is gone. But until then, Syracuse will provide more for her than she will for them.“She’s used to being a giant-killer, you know the David and Goliath story,” James said. “She’s used to being the underdog and coming out on top.”Taleah Washington hit a buzzer-beater before halftime in her first game at Syracuse. Elizabeth Billman | Asst. Photo EditorThere have been “magical” scenes for her this season, like in SU’s season-opener against Ohio when she faded away from the basket and hit a falling buzzer-beater before halftime. But with those have come the eye-opening ones for the freshman, like when she counted five open 3-pointers from her bench spot that the Orange surrendered to Miami’s Mykea Gray in their Jan. 12 loss — a player SU specifically addressed during pregame film.They’re so glaring because Washington looks for those same openings: The few extra inches on a wing. The closeouts a second too late. James had taught her that. He’d always been her coach, from Washington’s youth basketball days, when she’d give James the silent treatment on car rides home, to her high school years when she understood why he pushed her so much. Before coming to SU, James was the only coach Washington ever played for. She was introduced to the sport in second grade, when she’d watch James coach the Ballou (Maryland) High School boys’ team. That’s where Washington learned her first dribble move.As she got older, she featured more and more advanced moves. At Forestville, Washington was part of the first girls state championship in school history. But as her sophomore year wound down and the Knights neared a second-straight title, the school announced it was closing because of declining enrollment.Washington was devastated. This was not only her school but her mother and father’s too. During part one of the Board of Education Boundary Hearing — one of the final in the decision-making process — Washington hopped down the steps toward the podium clad in a gray Nike sweatshirt. As president of the sophomore class and captain of the basketball team, she spoke about how the closing would rip the Forestville community apart.“Forestville is very family-oriented,” Washington said during the hearing. “You always know that when you’re down on the ropes you have people to pick you up.”But she’d have to find that same quality at Rock Creek, where James took the head coaching job and Washington followed. So did some of Washington’s Forestville and Havoc City AAU teammates. The gym was outdated and had no air ventilation. On cold days in the winter, they couldn’t practice at all or had to use another gym. Players would put on layers under their practice jerseys, one of Washington’s teammates said. Washington and her team sometimes returned to Forestville for practice, using its track to shuffle and backpedal, using the gym for mountain-climbers, wind sprints and crab walks. They’d complete the “seven trees” drill that involved running up a steep hill and weaving through each tree along the way. When Rock Creek scrimmaged, they didn’t practice sets. James and other assistant coaches would play, but their offense relied on freedom. She’s used to being a giant-killer, you know the David and Goliath story. She’s used to being the underdog and coming out on top.-James Washington, father of Taleah WashingtonWith Washington averaging nearly a triple-double as a senior, Rock Creek ranked as one of the top high school teams in the country. It played on the Nike Tournament of Champions circuit, traveling to Arizona in the winter and playing in the top bracket despite not practicing for weeks. Then came the New York Rose Classic, a trip to Maryland and other national tournaments, all with Washington at the forefront.“I call it the invisible bag,” James said. “We put our money, our coins and rubbed our coins together to help accumulate all this money and scholarship.”By her senior year, Washington had decommitted from Old Dominion and signed with Syracuse. She knew Hillsman from attending his Elite Camp growing up — and James knew him from Forestville, too — but then the post-grad year came on her radar. After James revealed the fate of DME in the Daytona Beach living room, he created his own prep team — called Empowerment — that completed DME’s schedule and sprinkled in other games against Florida junior colleges. They finished runner-up in the independent national championship in Charlotte, and one-by-one the girls moved out of the school-provided housing and into James’ apartment. Washington became the team cook, assistant coach and go-to player on the court. She listed what each player wanted to eat and assembled meals like chicken alfredo and lasagna. When they traveled, the group rented vans because James’ two-door Mercedes Benz couldn’t fit everyone — even when they crammed four girls into the back row. Parents pitched in money to help along the way, but the bulk of it came from the Washingtons’ account.“It made her hungry,” Hillsman said. “That was a rocky path for her.”At SU, instead of living with seven teammates and her father, Washington has a South Campus apartment. She only has to cook for herself when she wants to, and post-practice meals at the Carmelo K. Anthony Center are always available. Washington’s the happiest she’s ever been, James said. She finally has some stability. Comments Published on February 4, 2020 at 11:15 pm Contact Andrew: arcrane@syr.edu | @CraneAndrewlast_img read more