first_imgJackie Chan has blogged about the importance of his Build A School For A Dollar project.“Every time I come back to Hong Kong, I get to see all the Build a School donations that children from all corners of the world send to me,” he blogged on his official website. “Some of you might be asking – why are they sending me money? Well, many years ago, I made a request to all the children around the world and started the Build a School for a dollar project. If everyone donates their pocket money or spare change to me, no matter how much or how little, even just one dollar, I will match every dollar with another dollar and use all your donations towards charity.“Over the years, my office has continuously received donations from children all over the world. This time, I saw that a group of students from Germany drew many Chinese paintings and auctioned them off as a charity fundraising event for my Build a School for a Dollar project. In the end, they raised $650 Euros and sent it to my office. Also, a group of children from America amazingly wrote a Chinese letter to me. I was so surprised! All donations received by these young children, and my promise to match every dollar with another dollar, will all be used towards building another Dragon’s Heart school.“I’m so happy to receive your continual support towards charity over the many years. You are the peace and hope of our future! Thank you all for making this world a better place and more heartwarming!”Find out more about Jackie Chan’s Build A School For A Dollar project here.Source:JackieChan.comlast_img read more


first_imgThe United Nations has launched the #WildforLife campaign against illegal trade in wildlife, warning that such trade is pushing species to the brink of extinction, robbing countries of their natural heritage and profiting international criminal networks.UNEP Goodwill Ambassador Gisele Bündchen taking part in the #Wildforlife campaign“Each year, thousands of wild animals are illegally killed, often by organized criminal networks motivated by profit and greed,” said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in a press release. “I call on all Governments and people everywhere to support the new United Nations campaign, Wild for Life, which aims to mobilize the world to end this destructive trade. Preserving wildlife is crucial for the well-being of people and planet alike,” he added.The campaign, which was launched today at the second UN Environment Assembly (UNEA-2) in Nairobi, aims to mobilize millions of people to make commitments and take action to end the illegal trade in wildlife.The campaign is run by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).The initiative is being backed by celebrities from across the globe, including UNEP Goodwill Ambassadors. These include Brazilian model Gisele Bundchen, who is fighting for sea turtles; four-time African Footballer of the Year Yaya Touré (Manchester City, Côte d’Ivoire), who is backing elephants; and actor Ian Somerhalder (Vampire Diaries, Lost), who is rooting for pangolins.They are being joined by major celebrities from China, India, Indonesia, Lebanon and Viet Nam battling to conserve species such as orangutans, tigers, rhinos and helmeted hornbills, and calling for citizen support to end the demand that is driving the illegal trade, the agencies said.“It saddens me that in the 21st century, with all our knowledge and power, we are still hearing stories of wildlife facing the possibility of extinction at the hands of man,” said Ms. Bündchen.“Knowledge is power and now is the time to set our minds to ending all illegal wildlife trade before the choice is no longer in our hands. Today, I am giving my name to change the game for sea turtles,” she added.Between 2010 and 2012, 100,000 elephants were killed for their ivory in Africa. Three rhinos are killed every day, and the western black rhino has already become extinct. Pangolins – scaly anteaters – are the most illegally trafficked mammal in the world. Great apes are already locally extinct in several African nations, the agencies stressed.The campaign asks participants to find their kindred species and use their own spheres of influence to end the illegal trade, however it touches or impacts them.Profits from the illegal wildlife trade sometimes go into the pockets of international criminal networks, threatening peace and security, and damaging the livelihoods of local communities who depend on tourism.Stopping this trade is also crucial to achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as it threatens countries’ biodiversity and people’s livelihoods, and disturbs peace. (SDG 15) in particular calls for the protection of wild fauna and flora, as well as the ecosystems that they depend on – including targets on combatting and addressing the supply and demand of illegal wildlife products, the agencies said.Politicians, celebrities and business leaders will be making pledges during UNEA-2 and in the run-up to World Environment Day, which is observed on 5 June and whose theme this year is “Go Wild For Life” to tie in with the campaign. Angola, the global host of this year’s Day, will be making significant pledges to tackle the illegal ivory trade at the event.John Kay, the lead singer of Steppenwolf, a Canadian-American rock group, donated the use of the group’s iconic 1968 hit song Born to Be Wild to the campaign.To find out more, click here.last_img read more


first_img Facebook The part you play in making the news is very important. Whether it is breaking news or a featured item, your contribution can make a difference.The Canadian Entertainment is fragmented … everyone has a story or event they would like to share.  While everyone is not on all social media platforms – the one thing 99% of the public has is … internet access.Use the eBOSS Canada platform to help spread your news – we will help you share your story to the industry (on all platforms).  You share, we share … and … we encourage our readers to share. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment HOW TO POST AN ARTICLEGo to the eBOSS Canada Home PageClick the POST AN ARTICLE Button (the Purple Button) – click to see sample pictureFill out the formUpload an imageViola!  That’s it!  🙂We will review your article(we do not proofread for errors)Once your article is approved … it wil appear online.Selected articles will be shared on the eBOSS Canada’s Social Media Platforms.HIRING CREW? CASTING A PRODUCTION?  CLICK HERE to post your Job/Casting NoticeHAVE AN UPCOMING EVENT? COURSE? WORKSHOP?  CLICK HERE to post your eventWANT TO PROMOTE YOUR COMPANY OR SERVICES?  CLICK HERE to add your Company or Services to the Industry Directory.LET US HELP YOU SPREAD THE WORDDon’t wait to be published – Post and Publish your story now Twitter Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more


first_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Advertisement I’ll be completely honest, when you watch as much television as I do there are few moments that really surprise me or take my breath away. A lot of times, those surprising moments come in the form of shocking character deaths or some unexpected twist that spells all kinds of trouble and tragedy for a beloved character. Very rarely do those surprise moments come in the form of a happy, tender moment that truly touches my heart and makes me smile from ear to ear. Those kind of moments? Well, those are even more rare and more special and that’s exactly what Dan Levy and Schitt’s Creek delivered in this week’s episode, “The Gesture.”After having their first major rift, in which David (Levy) found out that his boyfriend Patrick (Noah Reid) had still been in touch with his ex-fiancee, Patrick had been trying for a week to smooth things over. Part of his plan was to send David gifts every day to try and show him how much he was invested in the relationship. David being David, kept Patrick in his state of misery a tad longer than necessary just so he could keep getting gifts. Naturally, when Patrick found this out he was a little upset. You see, he had been extending David these olive branches each day and now he wanted one extended in return that showed David wasn’t just in this relationship for the gifts. Twitterlast_img read more


first_img Twitter TORONTO – Today, RBC and the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television (The Canadian Academy) announced their partnership on a new initiative called the Music Video Production Project (MVP Project). The MVP Project will support and promote emerging Canadian recording artists and filmmakers in the creation of music video content, increasing resources available within the national music community.“RBC has worked closely with the music and film communities to create a program that specifically focuses on emerging artists, so they too have access to critical funding,” said Matt McGlynn, Vice President of Brand Marketing, RBC. “We’re thrilled to found the MVP Project alongside The Canadian Academy, which will boost Canada’s music economy.”Established by RBCxMusic and the Prism Prize, the MVP Project will be administered by The Canadian Academy, aiming to enable Canadian creatives to explore their craft, hone their filmmaking skills, and encourage growth within their respective industries. In addition to today’s announcement, The Canadian Academy has officially acquired the Prism Prize, which will be fully integrated into the national organization. Facebook Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: The MVP Project is open to recording artists and/or directors who identify as “Emerging Artists“. Over two rounds of funding support for artists and storytellers will be offered through music video production grants valued between $5,000 and $15,000. Each round will also include a curated component, which aims to foster an existing director/recording artist relationship. In addition to the grants, successful candidates will receive mentorship and networking opportunities.“Canadian music video directors are bringing into the world some of the most exciting, creative and genre-busting visual stories of our time,” said Louis Calabro, Vice President Programming, The Canadian Academy and Founder of the Prism Prize. “We see an undisputed urgency and relevance to the work of music video and we could not be more excited to welcome these often-overlooked filmmakers into the Canadian Academy fold.”Applications will be assessed by a peer-based jury of music and media professionals with representation from all Canadian regions. Submissions for the first round of the MVP Project open October 1, 2018 and close November 1, 2018. The second round of applications will open in January 2019. Successful applicants will be announced eight to 12 weeks after the final application deadline for each round.The new MVP Project is part of the RBC Emerging Artists Project, which helps artists bridge the gap from emerging to established, and supports organizations that provide the best opportunity to advance their career trajectory.More information can be found at: www.mvpproject.ca.About RBCRoyal Bank of Canada is a global financial institution with a purpose-driven, principles-led approach to delivering leading performance. Our success comes from the 84,000+ employees who bring our vision, values and strategy to life so we can help our clients thrive and communities prosper. As Canada’s biggest bank, and one of the largest in the world based on market capitalization, we have a diversified business model with a focus on innovation and providing exceptional experiences to our 16 million clients in Canada, the U.S. and 34 other countries. Learn more at rbc.com.‎We are proud to support a broad range of community initiatives through donations, community investments and employee volunteer activities. See how at rbc.com/community-sustainability.About the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television The Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television is the largest non-profit professional arts organization in Canada. We are dedicated to recognizing, advocating for and celebrating Canadian talent in the film, television and digital media sectors. Our more than 4,500 members encompass industry icons and professionals, emerging artists and students. Collectively, we deliver professional development programs and networking opportunities that foster industry growth, inclusion and mentorship.For information on membership and programming, visit www.academy.ca. Advertisementlast_img read more


first_imgCharles Foran is the Toronto-based author of several books, including Mordecai, an award-winning biography of Mordecai Richler. (James Lahey) Advertisement Charles Foran has been awarded the $50,000 2018 Writers’ Trust of Canada Fellowship for being “one of the leading Canadian voices of our time.”The fellowship is given to writers who have “demonstrated exceptional creative ability and outstanding promise.”The fellowship was established in 2015. The previous recipients were Michael Crummey in 2015, Miriam Toews in 2016 and Eden Robinson last year. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook Login/Register With: Twitter Advertisementlast_img read more


first_imgAPTN National newsKateri Tekawitha, also known as the Lily of the Mohawks, is now officially a saint.Millions of people all around the world shared the celebration of her canonization by Pope Benedict on Oct. 21 in Rome.Indigenous Catholics have long awaited this recognition and now have a special saint to call upon.APTN National News reporter Danielle Rochette has this story.last_img


first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsThe Tsuu T’ina Nation says a First Nations water bill proposed by the Harper government would leave its people parched in the midst of a major water shortage crunch.Alberta has been termed as a “bellweather” region in the global crisis over water scarcity and the Tsuu T’ina Nation reserve, which borders the southwest city limits of Calgary, finds itself fighting with the industrial, agricultural sectors along with neighbouring municipalities over an increasingly dwindling resource.During a presentation before the Aboriginal affairs committee Tuesday, a Tsuu T’ina Nation band councillor said the Harper government’s proposed bill S-8, an Act respecting the safety of drinking water on First Nations land, would sever Ottawa’s treaty responsibility to the First Nation and put it at the mercy of Alberta’s water regime that doesn’t recognize its rights over water.“The issue here is what if there is a conflict between the drinking water needs of a First Nation and a water allocation for irrigation or industrial purposes,” said Coun. Regena Crowchild. “The proposed act makes it very clear that water allocations by the provinces will be paramount over the drinking water needs of First Nations.”Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, who appeared before Crowchild, told the committee the bill is necessary to improve the water situation for First Nations across the country by creating water-related regulations on-reserve.“Until regulations are in place, we know that achieving long-term sustainable progress will be challenging,” said Valcourt. “Modern equipment and good intentions are great, but they need regulations to support them. That is why all municipalities and communities off reserve across Canada have regulations in place.Valcourt said Ottawa is not trying to give any province jurisdiction over First Nations territory, but is simply creating a framework that would allow for regulations comparable to what exists off reserve.According to Crowchild, however, First Nations don’t need Ottawa’s help on this front and Tsuu T’ina is already developing its own water regulations.“All indications are that the proposed Act will simply adopt provincial laws and regulations regarding safe drinking water and waste water systems,” said Crowchild. “But the reality is that a large amount of water pollution on reserve lands is caused by weak provincial water standards…or by lack of enforcement of the law and regulations by the province.”The Tsuu T’ina, which signed Treaty 7 in 1877, chose the location of its 69,000 acre reserve between two rivers, the Bow and the Elbow, in hopes of securing water sources in perpetuity.“All of these sources of water have been largely polluted by industrial, agricultural and residential development,” said Crowchild, during her presentation to the committee which is studying the bill. “That is why we are very concerned about water pollution and safe drinking water.”For over a century, Alberta has relied on a water allocation regime based on water licenses which relies on a “first in time, first in right” principle, which essentially gives priority to those who have held licenses the longest.The Tsuu T’ina took Alberta to court over the issue. The matter is before the Alberta Court of Appeals. As it stands, however, the nation holds no water licenses, but maintains Treaty 7 is the only license the nation needs.The Tsuu T’ina Nation currently purchases its water from Calgary, brings in trucked water and also relies partially on underground water sources that are heavy with iron content.Drained by agricultural and oil and gas demands, Alberta’s rivers have faced 20 to 80 per cent declines in water levels over the past 100 years. Tsuu T’ina Coun. Gilbert Crowchild said southern Alberta would be bone dry within 50 years.Crowchild said Ottawa has a treaty responsibility to the Tsuu T’ina to help offset the expected spike in costs for keeping the taps flowing on the reserve.Under the proposed legislation, Crowchild said Ottawa is “washing its hands” of its responsibility.“Why is it we have to buy something we have never paid for in our life?” said Gilbert Crowchild.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more


first_imgTom Fennario APTN NewsJuliette Lisbeth Jérôme says she still has stains in her hair from the pepper spray attack.The Lac Simon First Nation woman says a stranger yelled racial slurs at her and her boyfriend before suddenly wielding the spray can last September.“It burned my eyes, and half my mouth became swollen, right here, my cheek also, I couldn’t feel anything,” Jérôme told the Quebec inquiry into Indigenous relations in Val-d’Or on Thursday.What makes the incident even more upsetting for Jérôme is what she calls the police’s lack of response.“The complaint that we made, our statement, they don’t seem to take it into consideration, there’s still no investigation,” she testified.The Quebec inquiry into Indigenous relations was spurred by accusations that provincial police were abusing Indigenous people in the city of Val-d’Or.Adding insult to injury, Jérôme said she recognizes the man who assaulted her. She said he works at a local grocery store.“Last time I saw him at the IGA he said to me ‘Oh, let me go get my pepper spray’. He still threatens me, it doesn’t stop.”When questioned why she doesn’t go to police to provide this new information, she said she’s afraid.Jérôme had her own run-in with the provincial police this past Christmas. She was charged and found guilty of simple assault for repeatedly hitting her boyfriend with her purse.Jérôme marvels at how her own case was treated – compared to the assault she reported.And she said she’s not the only Algonquin to feel this way.“The police come down hard on Indigenous folks, and that’s discrimination and that needs to be fixed and needs to be stopped.”Jérôme hopes the Quebec inquiry will address what she sees as a double standard.The hearings continue Friday and the final report is due in September 2019.tfennario@aptn.calast_img read more


first_imgTina HouseAPTN NewsPrime Minister Justin Trudeau flew to British Columbia to meet with members of the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee for the Trans Mountain expansion pipeline project in Cheam B.C. Tuesday.The committee was put together in January and consists of eleven different First Nation communities along the pipeline route.It provides advice about a broad range of issues including environmental and socio-economic outcomes and safety.Trudeau was met by a group of about 30 water protectors carrying signs and drumming.thouse@aptn.ca@inthehouse7last_img read more


first_imgTom FennarioAPTN NewsAbout 70 people met Tuesday in Kuujjuaq to discuss the suicide crisis currently gripping Nunavik.Puvirnituq, one of Nunavik’s 14 communities, has been the hardest hit, with eleven people having taken their own lives since the beginning of 2018.Tunu Napartuk, the mayor of Kuujjuaq, opened the meeting with words that implored action.“We are talking about the same thing from ten years ago, we keep passing the buck. We need to break this wall, during today and tomorrow, how can we start breaking the wall?” said Napartuk in Inuktitut.Robert Watt, head commissioner of Kativik Ilisarniliriniq (the Nunavik school board) called this emergency meeting. Many of the Inuit who have died were high school students.“I believe we need to come out with a system, a system whereby all these organizations and all these service providers that have their own little way of trying to deal with suicide but we’re really not putting all these plans together so we have one plan, one plan that includes everybody’s input,” said Watt.The meeting took a long break at midday so participants could attend the funerals of two people who died of apparent suicide late last week.Napartuk emphasized the idea of not just preventing suicide, but promoting life by teaching the youth to be proud of being Inuit.“I am very proud to say the Inuit people were the only ones who can survive this harsh country before there was any modern electricity or vehicles, I think we have forgotten where we come from,” said Napartuk, who also lamented an excessive stoicism amongst Inuit.“We’re very good at hiding our pain. We’re very good at lying to ourselves.”If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts you can call:Canada Suicide Prevention Service | 1-833-456-4566Nunavut Kamatsiaqtut Help Line  | for Inuktitut speakers (from 7pm -midnight eastern standard time)Lucassie Iyaituq agrees. The 18 year old coordinator for the youth centre in Puvirnituq says he’s lost people close to him. He read aloud a statement he wrote for Inuit youth imploring them speak up and seek help.“You, I love you, no matter who you are, we need you, you have to help us, you have to stay with us, you are loved, please talk to anyone, social services, teachers, police officers, talk to your friends,” said Iyaituq in Inuktitut, before adding, “I’m hoping there will be action taken right away.”Wednesday the meetings will continue with a presentation by the Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services, who will touch on the 2016 Inuit suicide prevention strategy and what needs to be done to make it more effective.Napartuk said the importance of getting things right is nothing short of a matter of life and death.“If not, we’re going to come back here in five years and talk about the same thing again.”tfennario@aptn.ca@tfennariolast_img read more


first_imgTORONTO – A decade after Apple launched its original smartphone, the lineups at stores are back today as the ultra-expensive iPhone X comes to the market after months of anticipation.In Canada, the smartphone with a lush screen and facial recognition technology is being listed between $1,350 or $1,570 before carrier discounts.By comparison, the iPhone 8 that’s been available since September is listed at $950 or $1,170 depending on memory.Apple Canada says its stores are putting on extra staff and opening at 8 a.m. local time to handle the anticipated crowds.It won’t disclose how many devices it expects to have available on the first day, although each store has some of the newest Apple smartphones available for walk-up customers.In addition, customers who pre-ordered the phone early enough through Apple will be given time slots for picking up their device. The device will be available through other retailers and wireless network carriers.last_img read more


first_imgATLANTIC CITY, N.J. – Former Fox News Channel anchor and 1989 Miss America Gretchen Carlson was named chairwoman of the Miss America Organization’s board of directors Monday, and three other past pageant winners will join her on the board.The new leadership comes less than two weeks after leaked emails surfaced showing CEO Sam Haskell and others disparaging the appearance, intellect and sex lives of former Miss Americas. Haskell resigned Dec. 23, along with two other top leaders.The selection of Carlson marks the first time a former pageant winner has served as the leader of the nearly 100-year-old organization. The organization also announced the appointments of three other past Miss Americas: 2012 winner Laura Kaeppeler Fleiss, 2000 winner Heather French Henry and Kate Shindle, who won in 1998 and now serves as president of the Actors’ Equity Association. Their appointments take effect immediately, as does Carlson’s.“Everyone has been stunned by the events of the last several days, and this has not been easy for anyone who loves this program,” Carlson said in a statement issued by the Miss America Organization. “In the end, we all want a strong, relevant Miss America and we appreciate the existing board taking the steps necessary to quickly begin stabilizing the organization for the future.”Carlson said she and the new board would immediately work with all Miss America stakeholders, including the organization’s state executive directors and former state titleholders, “to continue an ongoing inclusive and transparent process to identify additional new board members and management.”The new board also looks forward to working with the organization’s many sponsors, “seeking input while creating a viable, forward-looking Miss America Organization for this and future generations of young women,” Carlson said.In the emails published last month by the Huffington Post, pageant officials ridiculed the appearance, intellect and sex lives of former Miss Americas. One email used a vulgar term for female genitalia to refer to past Miss America winners, another included a wish that a particular former Miss America had died and others speculated about the number of sex partners former Miss America Mallory Hagan has had.The ensuing uproar led to the resignations of Haskell; the group’s president, Josh Randle; board chairwoman Lynn Weidner, and another board member.The emails already cost the pageant its television production partner and raised questions about the future of the nationally televised broadcast from Atlantic City’s Boardwalk Hall the week after Labor Day each year.Dick Clark Productions cut ties with the Miss America Organization over the emails, calling them “appalling.”last_img read more


first_imgQUEBEC – The Trudeau government has told President Donald Trump he needs to get rid of the punishing U.S. tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum if there is any hope of successfully renegotiating the North American Free Trade Agreement.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Finance Minister Bill Morneau said that message was communicated clearly to Trump during his meetings at the G7 leaders’ summit, which is wrapping up Saturday.Trudeau said he told Trump directly that Canadians “particularly did not take lightly the fact that it’s based on a national security reason” and held firm to the government’s threat of retaliation.“Canadians are polite, we’re reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around.”But Trump appeared to take Trudeau’s criticism personally, and denounced the prime minister hours after he departed the G7 summit on Saturday.“Based on Justin’s false statements at his news conference, and the fact that Canada is charging massive Tariffs to our U.S. farmers, workers and companies, I have instructed our U.S. Reps not to endorse the Communique as we look at Tariffs on automobiles flooding the U.S. Market!,” the president wrote.Trump then called Trudeau “Very dishonest & weak” in a follow-up tweet.PM Justin Trudeau of Canada acted so meek and mild during our @G7 meetings only to give a news conference after I left saying that, “US Tariffs were kind of insulting” and he “will not be pushed around.” Very dishonest & weak. Our Tariffs are in response to his of 270% on dairy!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) June 9, 2018It was not immediately clear where the new round of aggression would leave the two leaders and their mercurial attempts to find trade peace.Earlier while still in Quebec, Trump said he wants to make a deal on NAFTA, and he’s open to working with the current pact or striking separate agreements with Canada and Mexico — as long as they agree to renegotiate every five years.Canada wants a deal too, but Trudeau reiterated the government view that the U.S.’s proposed five-year sunset clause is a non-starter.Canada is now adding the tariffs to its list of deal breakers on NAFTA. Morneau said progress is being made, but more work needs to be done to conclude the negotiations.“We’re not going to be able to do that work under the threat of tariffs. And we’re not going to be able to do that work when our retaliatory tariffs, which are real, they’re significant,” Morneau said in a Saturday interview.The government announced it would impose more than $16.6-billion in retaliatory tariffs, effective July 1, on a variety of U.S. goods. Mexico and the European Union have also planned retaliatory tariff packages.Trump said that would be a bad idea.“If they retaliate, they’re making a mistake,” he said.“They do so much more business with us than we do with them … the numbers are so astronomically against them … we win that war a thousand times out of a thousand.”Trudeau said Canada wasn’t backing down.“I highlighted that it was not helping in our renegotiation of NAFTA and that it would be with regret, but it would be with absolute certainty and firmness that we move forward with retaliatory measures on July 1.”Trudeau and the other G7 leaders used their meeting to try to persuade Trump to abandon the tariffs, which affect all of America’s G7 allies.British Prime Minister Theresa May said the other G7 leaders registered their “deep disappointment at the unjustified decision by the U.S.” on its closest allies.“The loss of trade through tariffs undermines competition, reduces productivity and removes the incentive to innovate and ultimately makes everyone poorer,” she said.Once again, Trump emphasized that the days of the U.S. getting the short end of the stick in its trading relationships with the world were over under his watch.And he made clear that extends to the current deal the U.S. is renegotiating with its continental neighbours, Canada and Mexico.“We’re either going to have NAFTA in a better negotiated form or we’re going to have two deals,” the U.S. president said.But by insisting on re-negotiating every five years, Trump is diametrically opposed with Canada, which says the sunset clause would create perpetual uncertainty and harm long-term investment.Disagreement over the sunset clause was the deal breaker that scuttled a possible meeting between Trump and Trudeau in Washington late last month in an attempt to bring the NAFTA talks to a conclusion.Vice President Mike Pence told Trudeau he would have to agree to that before Trump would agree to meet him.Trudeau refused, and the meeting was off. But the lead ministers from both countries talked trade on the sidelines of the G7 leaders’ meeting on Friday.“On NAFTA we either leave it the way it is as a three-some deal with Canada, the United States and Mexico and change it very substantially — we’re talking about very big changes. Or we’re going to make a deal directly with Canada, directly with Mexico,” Trump said Saturday.“If a deal isn’t made, that would be a very bad thing for Canada and a very bad thing for Mexico. To United States, frankly, it would be a good thing but I’m not looking to do that. I’m not looking to play that game.”Trump repeated his criticism of Canada’s supply managed dairy industry, one of his favourite targets in Twitter posts, including this week prior to his arrival in Canada.Pierre Lampron, the president of Dairy Farmers of Canada, shot back at Trump’s claims about his industry.“President Trump is targeting the dairy sector because he wants to dump U.S. dairy into Canada,” Lampron told The Canadian Press, adding that Canada imports five times more dairy from the U.S. than it exports.“President Trump wants nothing less than wiping out Canadian dairy farming.”last_img read more


first_imgCAMDEN, N.J. — Campbell Soup Co. said Monday that it will add two members to its board in a compromise with an activist investor.The new directors on the 14-member board are backed by Third Point, a New York investment firm that owns 7 per cent of Campbell’s shares.Third Point waged a months-long campaign against the 149-year-old company and its leadership, including three descendants of Campbell’s founder who sit on the board. Campbell’s U.S. soup sales were down 8 per cent in its 2018 fiscal year as customers have sought fresher alternatives.The change will give Third Point more input in Campbell’s current CEO search. In exchange, Third Point will withdraw its slate of five board candidates and halt its campaign for 12 months.Shareholders will consider the change Thursday at Campbell’s annual meeting.Shares in the company based in Camden, New Jersey, were down 3.7 per cent to $39.03 in afternoon trading.The Associated Presslast_img read more


first_imgTORONTO — Councillors in Toronto are set to debate whether to allow retail pot shops in Canada’s largest city.City staff recommend that councillors allow privately run cannabis stores to operate in Toronto, saying it would “would have the unintended consequence of encouraging the illegal market.”The issue is on the agenda for today’s council meeting, a day after councillors in two neighbouring municipalities voted against having pot shops within their boundaries.Councillors in Mississauga and Markham voted Wednesday to opt out of hosting privately operated retail cannabis stores, which are expected to open across Ontario next spring.Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie and Markham’s Frank Scarpitti both said there are too many unanswered questions.However, Toronto Mayor John Tory says he plans to move a motion to allow pot shops — while acknowledging he’s not satisfied with the way things are now.“To me, the option of saying there aren’t going to be any in Toronto leaves us in the situation we’re in now, where we have a lot of illegal pot shops,” Tory told local TV station CP24 on Wednesday night.“And I don’t think we want this left in the hands of what amounts to organized crime.”The Canadian Presslast_img read more


first_imgEvents are free except for the Paint Night to cover fees for the supplies.“This is a celebration and everybody is welcome to attend and enjoy themselves,” said Trudeau TUMBLER RIDGE, B.C.- Is home to the week-long celebration of winter, there are planned daily events that offer something for everybody to do.The Winter Carnival is an initiative by Council that was created after the 2010 Olympics, since that time this event is greatly appreciated and welcomed by the community. With Tumbler Ridge being a Northern community and surrounded by recreation, Council wanted to continue the event every year shared Roxanne Trudeau, Coordinator of Programming District of Tumbler Ridge.The week-long event starts on January 21st, 2019 and runs through until January 26th, 2019, by involving local non-profit groups and other groups from the community to help run the events. last_img read more


first_imgNew Delhi: Citing the Pulwama terror attack, President Ram Nath Kovind Tuesday praised the valour and sacrifice of security forces in protecting the country and its citizens.Forces such as the Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) have been playing a pivotal role in checking separatism and terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir, he said. “The valour and bravery with which CRPF personnel faced the terrorists, who attacked the Parliament (in 2001), have become part of the legend of the country’s security forces. “CPRF personnel have played an appreciable role in checking separatism and terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir,” he said during a remembrance service at the National Police Memorial here. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’The service marks the annual ‘Valour Day’ of the CRPF which remembers the gallant fight back by its personnel at the Sardar post in Gujarat’s Rann of Kutch against Pakistani troop on this day in 1965. The president paid tributes to police and paramilitary personnel killed in the line of duty, including the 40 CRPF jawans who lost their lives in the February 14 Pulwama terror attack. He laid a wreath at the memorial, a 30-foot-tall and 238-tonne black granite structure, which was unveiled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on October 21 last year on police commemoration day. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KKovind said a pall of gloom had descended on the country after the Pulwama attack.”People queued up to pay their respect to their (the CRPF personnel) sacrifice. I on behalf of the whole nation paid my deepest respect in remembrance of those brave hearts,” he said. Police personnel have always been alert and active to ensure the safety of the people, and have shown extraordinary commitment towards the nation, he said. This is for the first time that the president has visited the memorial located at Chanakyapuri here. Kovind, the supreme commander of the armed forces, was accorded a “national salute” and presented a guard of honour by a joint column of troops from all the Central Armed Police Forces (CAPFs) such as the CRPF, BSF, ITBP, CISF and SSB. Union Home Secretary Rajiv Gauba; Director of the Intelligence Bureau, Rajiv Jain; Director of CRPF, Rajeev Rai Bhatnagar; and other officials from paramilitary forces, police and the Union Home Ministry attended the event. In 1965, CRPF troops were posted on border-guarding duties and the Sardar post event is mentioned as a glorious chapter in the country’s military history when only two companies (about 150 personnel) of the force stood their ground and repulsed a Pakistani brigade attack.last_img read more